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The first Making Friends course, run by the Toby Henderson Trust in Northumberland, has now been hailed a success by delighted parents of the youngsters who took part.
Being popular was the third biggest worry for boys behind bullying, while girls put making friends as their second biggest concern.
Note, for example, Ta Thi Minh Hong, who says young people no longer care so much about independence, that today the focus is on music, fashion, making friends, and going on picnics.
Studying dance at the University of Urbino in this beautiful Italian Renaissance town that is about two hours from Florence, joining the community and learning the language, taking time to explore the rest of Italy and other parts of Europe, and making friends from all over the world have kept many dancers coming back to this program year after year.
Self-acceptance is the start to making friends and having interesting and fun things to do.
These girls generally expressed a dislike for making friends, caring for animals, and playing with Barbie dolls, all favored by the other group of girls.
The magic of camp is that kids end up trying things they never dreamed of and making friends with peers from all over the country and the world," says Billy Dannals, 30, director of summer programs at YMCA Storer Camps in Jackson, Mich.
Because of her ADHD, Elana also had trouble making friends with her classmates.
In terms of making friends in the real world, after-school clubs are a really good way to meet other kids with the same interests.
Following a short assembly rst thing, the boys then accompanied their Learning Leader to their new House and spent the rst lesson of the day making friends with the rst thing, the boys then accompanied their Learning Leader to their new House and spent the rst lesson of the day making friends with the other boys who will remain in their tutor group for the next ve years.
Washington, March 17 (ANI): A Harvard University study has shown that when it come to making friends, children prefer those whose speech patterns - rather than skin colour - mimic their own.