marge

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Marger, Martin (2006) "Transnationalism or assimilation?
In his assessment of the characteristics of these conflicts, Marger identified such conflicts in the United States, Sri Lanka, India, Burundi, South Africa, Sudan, Lebanon, Spain, Russia, several of the former republics of the Soviet Union and Germany.
This is a 38 percent increase over the recorded 1980 population, and four times the 1960 population estimate (Lewis, 1995; Marger, 1994).
Marger, Race and Ethnic Relations: American and Global Perspectives, 5th Edition (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2000).
As Martin Marger points out, contemporary ethnic relations involve a paradox: while groups pursue the retention of an ethnic culture, forces such as mass communication, mass transportation, and universal education continue to erode those cultural differences by compressing cultural singularities into common forms.
The ruling came in response to a lawsuit filed by parent Diane Marger Moore, whose daughter attends fifth grade at Glenns Valley Elementary School.
Therefore, we] should understand ethnicity as a social process, as the moving boundaries and identities which people, collectively and individually, draw around themselves in their social lives" (Fenton 1999:10; also see Yetman 1985:8; Marger 1991:410; Gossett 1997:3-4).
That the construction of dualities is very much a part of a relationship associated with dominance and subordination, what Martin Marger refers to as "power-conflicts.
Olam buys UAP sugar mill, marger of Farley's & Sathers and Ferrara Pan Candy
Marger, Hicklin and Garner investigate the effects of Bikram yoga, which is a specific series of yoga postures performed in extreme heat, on body composition, blood pressure and sleep patterns.
Marger (2001) showed that the business class immigrants who came to Ontario with a sufficient amount of human capital--manifested in their business plans and managerial skills, among others--did not have to rely on their social capital to launch their businesses.