Mark

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mark

n. 1) an "X" made by a person who is illiterate or too weak to sign his/her full name, used in the expression "His Mark," or "Her Mark." On the rare occasion that this occurs, the "X" should be within or next to a notation such as "Theresa Testator, her mark." If the mark is intended as a signature to a will it should be formally witnessed (as signatures are) to make the will valid. (See: will)

MARK. This term has several acceptations. 1. It is a sign traced on paper or parchment, which stands in the place of a signature, usually made by persons who cannot write. 2 Cart. R. 324; M. & M. 516; 12 Pet. 150; 7 Bing. 457; 2 Ves. 455; 1 V. & B. 362; 1 Ves., jr. 11. A mark is now held to be a good signature, though the party was able to write. 8 Ad. & El. 94; 3 Nev. & Per. 228; 3 Curt. 752; 5 John. 144. Vide Subscription.
     2.-2. It is the sign, writing or ticket put upon manufactured goods to distinguish them from others. Poph. R. 144; 3 B & C. 541; 2 Atk. R. 485; 2 V. & B. 218; 3 M. & C. 1; Ed. Inj. 814. Vide Trade Marks.
     3.-3. Mark or marc, denotes a weight used in several parts of Europe, and for several commodities, especially gold and silver. When gold and silver are sold by the mark, it is divided into twenty-four carats.
     4.-4. Mark is also in England a money of accounts, and in some other countries a coin. The English marc is two-thirds of a pound sterling, or 13s. 4d., and the Scotch mark is of equal value in Scotch money of account. Ency. Amer. h.t.

References in classic literature ?
"Come, come, gentlemen, I say; this isn't business," said Marks. "There's different ways, you know, of looking at all subjects.
"Come, now, Loker, none of your huffs," said Marks, licking his lips; "you see, Mr.
Now take these two pantographs of B's autograph, marked five months and seven months.
"Take this third pantograph marked B, eight months.
``My grandsire,'' said Hubert, ``drew a good bow at the battle of Hastings, and never shot at such a mark in his life and neither will I.
``Sirrah Locksley, do thou shoot; but, if thou hittest such a mark, I will say thou art the first man ever did so.
"It is over the fifth!" cried a Gascon loudly, and a comrade came running with waving arms to say that the bolt had pitched eight paces beyond the mark of the five hundred.
"He stands on the further side of my mark," answered the Brabanter, "so he has little to fear from you."
"We've got to hitch to windward of that Mark Boat somehow," George cried.
The Mark Boat was below and a little to the sou'west of us, fluctuating in the centre of her distraught galaxy.
As he rushed, bull-like, toward Norman of Torn, the latter made no move to draw; he but stood with folded arms, eyeing Shandy with cold, level gaze; his head held high, haughty face marked by an arrogant sneer of contempt.
There was a certain rude, though chivalrous grandeur in the act; and it marked not only the beginning of a lifelong devotion and loyalty on the part of Shandy toward his young master, but was prophetic of the attitude which Norman of Torn was to inspire in all the men who served him during the long years that saw thousands pass the barbicans of Torn to crave a position beneath his grim banner.