Marshalsea


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Marshalsea: Little Dorrit, Marshalsea Court

Marshalsea

historically a court held before the knight marshal, abolished 1849.

MARSHALSEA, English law. The name of a prison belonging to the court of the king's bench.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although it pays only brief attention to his two months in the Marshalsea prison, the London narrative provides a highly textured description of events subsequent to the return of Cornelius to Dorchester in late June for trial and execution.
This is exemplified by George Wither's The Shepherd's Hunting (1615), a book romanticized by having been written in the Marshalsea, which is "very tiny and pretty, with a sort of leafy trellis-work at the top and bottom of every page, almost suggesting a little posy of wild-flowers thrown through the iron bars of the poet's cage, and pressed between the pages of his manuscript" (44).
Location of works, place of delivery supplies or performance: The Marshalsea, 1 Place Saint Exupry 91704 Sainte Genevive des Bois Cedex
NAME THE DEBTORS' PRISON FEATURED IN LITTLE DORRIT a) Pentonville b) Newgate c) Marshalsea
Within the Bifold Group, Marshalsea Hydraulics, is a leading designer and manufacturer of high quality pumps and valves, and provides a range of stainless steel pressure intensifiers for subsea and topside applications.
Debtors' prisons (such as the Fleet, Marshalsea and King's Bench) were regularly inhabited by musical instrument makers while the Compters (including Poultry and Wood Street) were smaller lockups under the control of local sheriffs.
There is, of course, Dorrit himself, who lives quite ably by his wit as the maudlin sponger of the Marshalsea, before slowly losing his wits when the financial windfall ensconces him among Europe's foremost idle rich.
Which novel by Charles Dickens features the Marshalsea Prison?
First there is the prison of Dickens's time (Marshalsea, in Little Dorrit, destroyed by fire in 1885), which is a literary forerunner.
The main characters in the novel, Amy and her family, have been incarcerated for many years in the Marshalsea, the debtor's prison.
In 1729, some three hundred inmates died in a three-month period alone in London's Marshalsea Prison.