Massachusetts Constitution of 1780

Massachusetts Constitution of 1780

In 1630, John Winthrop and his associates in the Massachusetts Bay Company established the Great and General Court of Massachusetts to provide a form of local government for the Puritans who had settled the Boston area. During the American Revolution, the General Court produced an initial draft of a state constitution for Massachusetts. The citizens of Massachusetts refused to accept this constitution as law, however, due to their nonparticipation in the process by which it was formed; instead they elected representatives to meet at a constitutional convention to determine the nature of their government. In 1779, the representatives convened in Cambridge and designated John Adams to be the primary drafter of the constitution. This constitution was ratified in 1780.

Among the terms of the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 is the provision that empowers the governor and his or her council or the legislature to obtain advisory opinions from the Supreme Judicial Court on questions relating to the scope of the power of the governor or legislature of the Commonwealth. Presently Massachusetts is the only one of the thirteen original states that has retained its first constitution. The constitution has, however, been subject to numerous amendments, the most extensive of which were made by the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention that was convened from 1917 to 1919.

References in periodicals archive ?
33) Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, Article 3, Bill of Rights.
John Adams led the committee that wrote the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780.
Return of the Town of Sutton on the Massachusetts Constitution of 1778, in THE POPULAR SOURCES OF POLITICAL AUTHORITY: DOCUMENTS ON THE MASSACHUSETTS CONSTITUTION OF 1780, at 237 (Oscar & Mary Handlin eds.
This issue of the Suffolk University Law Review acknowledges, and celebrates, the 230th anniversary of the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780.
He will discuss how the new Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 came to protect taxpayer-funded support of churches and the long campaign to disestablish the Congregational Church that finally succeeded through Constitutional amendment in 1833.
In addition to helping draft the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, Adams wrote Thoughts on Government (1776), Defence of the Constitutions of the United States of America (1786-87), and Discourses on Davila (1791).
From the Virginia Declaration of 1776 through the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 and later, the use of the term "Bill of Rights" was often heard.
A similar provision was included in the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780.
Thus, when Adams drafted the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 he proposed, and the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention adopted, a Bill of Rights that pointedly included an express guarantee of the right of every person to a remedy for all injuries.
The terms of the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 obligated the
The Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 is "the oldest written organic law still in operation anywhere in the world.
7 (1982); Symposium: Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, 14 SUFFOLK U.

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