set

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set

v. to schedule, as to "set a case for trial."

See: adjust, appraise, assemblage, assess, assign, cement, chain, chronic, class, compact, confederacy, crystallize, customary, deposit, designate, embed, firm, fix, fixed, formal, habitual, inexorable, ingrained, instate, inveterate, levy, locate, permanent, pertinacious, place, plant, positive, prescribe, prescriptive, prevalent, ready, repose, resolute, resolve, rigid, routine, settle, situated, society, stabilize, unyielding, usual

SET, contracts. Foreign bills of exchange are generally drawn in parts; as, "pay this my first bill of exchange, second and third of the same tenor and date not paid;" the whole of these parts, which make but one bill, are called a set. Chit. Bills, 175, 6, (edition of 1836); 2 Pardess. n. 342.

References in periodicals archive ?
The resolution to introduce the Customized Mathematical Set is aimed at curtailing examination malpractices and other misconducts on the part of candidates during the administration of exams.
For Umberto Eco, possible worlds are at base "cultural constructs," but, then again, so is the real world; for David Lewis, the founder of modal realism, possible worlds are just as real as the real world; and for David Hilbert, one of the early developers of mathematical set theory, the set-theoretical universe, which underpins possible worlds theory, quite simply is paradise.
Riehl, 17, of Bloomington, Ill., won the third-place $50,000 scholarship for her study of graphs of a mathematical set known as the Coxeter group.
Although this book is one that requires a high comfort level with mathematical set notation and logic notation and language, it is still possible for readers less familiar to glean some useful information from reading at least some parts of the book.
In his massive L'Etre et l'evenement (Being and the event), Badiou makes mathematical set theory the reader's guide to some 2,500 years of problems raised by ontology.
Mandelbrot defined fractals as a "mathematical set or object in which form is extremely irregular and/or fragmented at all scales." Fractals are constant, regardless of scale, and when magnified they appear as replicas in microcosm of the overall image, producing, in Mandelbrot's words, an "unending filigreed entanglement." James Gleick, author of the book CHAOS, an in-depth treatise on the subject, confirms the above and writes that the world displays a regular irregularity.
In all the 56 public and private schools visited, the MP gave each candidate a brand new mathematical set. A total of 2000 mathematical sets and other educational materials were given out to the candidates.

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