Transmission

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TRANSMISSION, civ. law. The right which heirs or legatees may have of passing to their successors, the inheritance or legacy to which they were entitled, if they happen to die without having exercised their rights. Domat, liv. 3, t. 1, s. 10; 4 Toull. n. 186; Dig. 50, 17, 54; Code, 6, 51.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
El-Sherbini, "The role of cockroaches and flies in mechanical transmission of medical important parasites," Journal of Entomology and Nematology, vol.
Chen, "Shifting control of an automated mechanical transmission without using the clutch," International Journal of Automotive Technology, vol.
She said the animals on the farm were probably infected by "mechanical transmission," for example by people or vehicles from the laboratory at Pirbright or the first two farms infected in August.
A Government report concluded the infection probably came from "mechanical transmission" - people or vehicles.
She said the animals on the farm were probably infected by "mechanical transmission", for example by people or vehicles, from the laboratory at Pirbright or the first two farms infected in August.
New free, downloadable PC software helps a mold designer review and select mechanical transmission components for injection tooling such as gear racks, threaded cores, cog wheels, bearings, helical spindles, and nuts.
I-SAM works together with an automatic, converted mechanical transmission, which was developed within the Volvo Group, an electronic control unit as well as conventional diesel engine and batteries that are charged by braking energy.
Additionally, the truck includes a Mitsubishi Fuso Inomat II automated mechanical transmission similar to the transmission used in Fuso Class 8 trucks.
All parts, including screws, barrels, mechanical transmission, and electrical components, can be sourced from Wayne.
Unlike a car, where it is easy to "tee" a second drive array from the transmission to the wheels, a motorcycle is essentially 2-dimensional and requires complex mechanical transmission components to drive the front wheel, resulting in awkward front suspension members and frame elements, together with unorthodox styling.
For example, a vector controlled adjustable speed drive may help to eliminate a mechanical transmission and, in turn, the energy lost in the mechanical part of the system.