diet

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diet

in Scots practice
1 the date fixed by a court for hearing a case.
2 a single session of a court.

DIET. An assembly held by persons having authority to manage the public affairs of the nation. In Germany, such assemblies are known by this name:

References in periodicals archive ?
"This is the largest study in pregnancy to show that Mediterranean diet minimizes the risk of gestational diabetes and weight gain.
The diets were formulated to closely reflect human diets with protein and fat derived largely from animal sources in the Western diet and primarily from plant sources in the Mediterranean diet.
Researchers at Saint Louis University have found that eating a Mediterranean diet can improve athletes' endurance exercise performance after just four days.
"Recommending the Mediterranean diet pattern, either to reduce the risk or lessen the effects...
After one year, systolic blood pressure was 5 1/2 points lower in the people assigned to the Mediterranean diet than in those told to eat their usual diet.
In a review by Luigi Fontana and colleagues, a number of potential health- modifying effects induced by the Mediterranean diet were considered, including: lipid reduction, protection against inflammation and oxidative stress, and modificationn of cancer-promoting growth factors.
The Italian study analysed the relationship between the traditional Mediterranean diet - comprising a mix of fruit, vegetables, fish, olive oil, and moderate wine consumption - and mortality.
Research into the traditional Mediterranean diet has shown it may reduce our risk of developing conditions like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and raised cholesterol, which are all risk factors for heart disease.
"We aggregated results from a large number of studies and there is a clear pattern that following a healthier, plant-rich, anti-inflammatory diet can help in the prevention of depression." The researchers analysed data from 41 studies, including four which examined the link between a traditional Mediterranean diet and mental health among 36,556 adults.
Lisa Mosconi from Weill Cornell Medicine found differences in brain imaging scans between people who reported eating a Mediterranean diet and those who ate a standard Western diet.

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