Litre

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Related to Megalitres: milliliter, microliters, microlitres

LITRE. A French measure of capacity. It is of the size of a decimetre, or one-tenth part of a cubic metre. It is equal to 61.028 cubic inches. Vide Measure.

References in periodicals archive ?
The initial installation showed a return on investment within six months--152 megalitres a day saved and a 40% reduction in bursts.
Thames Water was also keen to increase the average capacity from 400 to 750 Megalitres per day.
Regulator Ofwat has the power to fine firms that fail to meet leakage targets - with potential penalties up to 10 per cent of their turnover - but the North West Water owner said it met its 2010/11 benchmark of 464 megalitres a day.
The plant is expected to generate up to 16 megalitres of water per day and will provide sufficient water to meet the medium- and long-term needs of the mine.
About 170,000 megalitres is now gushing out of Wivenhoe Dam in to the river.
Around an extra 250 megalitres are being pumped into the system every day, Northern Ireland Water said today, but most of it is being lost in leakages from burst pipes.
CubicQED CEO, Mr David McMurran, says the minimum-scale commercial plant will initially cover three hectares, with 15 ponds containing 15 megalitres of water producing a minimum of 1.
Regarding his work at United Utilities, he says: "When you consider that we have 350 megalitres of sewage a day flowing through the treatment works, it is essential that it continues to operate efficiently in order to ensure the Mersey stays clean.
However companies still leaked 3,291 megalitres of water a day - enough to fill the bowl of the new Wembley stadium almost three times every 24 hours.
Mr Edis said the company had reported an estimated 340 megalitres per day of water loss while the true figure was 514 megalitres.
And Severn Trent said 10,000 homes in Tewkesbury, Glos, were due to get mains water last night after twenty megalitres were fed from Strensham water treatment works in South Worcestershire.
35 000 megalitres of water and used 2 400 000 hectares of land.