Ton

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TON. Twenty hundred weight, each hundred weight being one hundred and twelve pounds avoirdupois. See act of congress of Aug. 30, 1842, c. 270, s. 20.

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Each warhead carries a yield of 475 kilotons – just short of half a megaton. So ONE modern nuclear submarine is carrying around 60 megatons, or 3000 Nagasakis, in its sleek black belly.
According to the study by analyst Juniper Research, those 13 megatons would be equivalent the current annual emissions of 1.1 million cars and half of those 2019 greenhouse gases would come from mostly used in Asia's coal-fired electricity grids,.
Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow were each said to be in line for simlar 'air bursts' of up to ve megatons - 333 times more powerful than the nuclear bomb that notoriously destroyed the Japanese city of Hiroshima in August 1945, killing 140,000 people.
GOVERNMENT planners predicted Birmingham would be vapourised by two -ve megaton 'airburst' nuclear bombs in the event of war with Russia in the 1970s.
In terms of volume, however, imports showed a considerable 12.6 percent decline compared to last year, weighing 5.8 megatons. This indicates that global inflationary pressures are beginning to hamper demand for more imports.
Accounting for a reduction of 50 megatons of carbon-dioxide per year, America's 30,000 wind turbines reduce emissions by just one-tenth the amount that natural gas does.
Energy company, USEC Inc (NYSE:USU) stated on Wednesday that under the Megatons to Megawatts programme 425 metric tonnes of highly enriched uranium that is equal to 17,000 nuclear warheads, was eliminated.
Like all action pics from Besson's EuropaCorp, including helmer Megatons "The Transporter 3," "Colombiana" is slickly assembled.
Costa Rica emits about 12 megatons of carbon dioxide each year.
greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian oil sands in 2007 were 37 megatons out of a total in Canada of 747 megatons, ie.
Tested in 1961 within the Arctic Circle, this Russian hydrogen explosive detonated with the force of 50 megatons - TEN TIMES the explosives used in World War II, including the nukes dropped on Japan.