merchant

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merchant

noun businessperson, chandler, dealer, distributer, distributor, entrepreneur, handler, hawker, huckster, mercator, merchandiser, middleman, monger, peddler, retailer, salesperson, seller, shopkeeper, shopman, storekeeper, trader, vendor
Foreign phrases: Jus accrescendi inter mercatores, pro beneficio commercii, locum non habet.The right of surrivorship does not exist between merchants for the benefit of commerce.
See also: dealer, supplier, vendor

LAW, MERCHANT. A system of customs acknowledged and taken notice of by all commercial nations; and those customs constitute a part of the general law of the land; and being a part of that law their existence cannot be proved by witnesses, but the judges are bound to take notice of them ex officio. See Beawes' Lex Mercatoria Rediviva; Caines' Lex Mercatoria Americana; Com. Dig. Merchant, D; Chit. Comm. Law; Pardess. Droit Commercial; Collection des Lois Maritimes anterieure au dix hutiŠme siŠcle, par Dupin; Capmany, Costumbres Maritimas; II Consolato del Mare; Us et Coutumes de la Mer; Piantandia, Della Giurisprudenze Maritina Commerciale, Antica e Moderna; Valin, Commentaire sur l'Ordonnance de la Marine, du Mois d'Aout, 1681; Boulay-Paty, Dr. Comm.; Boucher, Institutions au Droit Maritime.

MERCHANT. One whose business it is to buy and sell merchandise; this applies to all persons who habitually trade in merchandise. 1 Watts & S. 469; 2 Salk. 445.
     2. In another sense, it signifies a person who owns ships, and trades, by means of them, with foreign nations, or with the different States of the United States; these are known by the name of shipping merchants. Com. Dig. Merchant, A; Dyer, R. 279 b; Bac. Ab. h.t.
     3. According to an old authority, there are four species of merchants, namely, merchant adventurers, merchant dormant, merchant travellers, and merchant residents. 2 Brownl. 99. Vide, generally, 9 Salk. R. 445; Bac. Ab. h.t.; Com. Dig. h.t.; 1 Bl. Com. 75, 260; 1 Pard. Dr. Com. n. 78

References in classic literature ?
The merchant went away, stepping on tiptoe, which only made his boots creak the louder, and Father Sergius remained alone.
He said a prayer which referred to his abandonment of the world, and hastened to finish it in order to send for the merchant with the sick daughter.
Accordingly the merchant's daughter interested him as a new individual who had faith in him, and also as a fresh opportunity to confirm his healing powers and enhance his fame.
He was pleased to know that the merchant's daughter was twenty-two, and he wondered whether she was good-looking.
He rang the bell and told the attendant to say that the merchant might bring his daughter to him now.
The French merchant at his trading post, in these primitive days of Canada, was a kind of commercial patriarch.
"I give you my word of honour," answered the merchant, "that I will come back without fail."
"I ask you for a year's grace," replied the merchant. "I promise you that to-morrow twelvemonth, I shall be waiting under these trees to give myself up to you."
The merchant, having recovered from his fright, mounted his horse and went on his road.
The next day the merchant began to settle his affairs, and first of all to pay his debts.
When he came to his father's house, he said he was his son; but the merchant would not believe him, and said he had had but one son, his poor Heinel, who he knew was long since dead: and as he was only dressed like a poor shepherd, he would not even give him anything to eat.
But the merchant said, 'that can never be true; he must be a fine king truly who travels about in a shepherd's frock!' At this the son was vexed; and forgetting his word, turned his ring, and wished for his queen and son.