laws

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LAWS, RHODIAN, maritime. law. A code of laws adopted by the people of Rhodes, who had, by their commerce and naval victories, obtained the sovereignty of the sea, about nine hundred. years before the Christian era. There is reason to suppose this code has not been transmitted to posterity, at least not in a perfect state. A collection of marine constitutions, under the denomination of Rhodian Laws, may be seen in Vinnius, but they bear evident marks of a spurious origin. See Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 4, p. 15; this Dict. Code; Laws of Oleron; Laws of Wisbuy; Laws of the Hanse Towns.

References in periodicals archive ?
It also shows, however, that the betting exchange is very dependent on customers providing liquidity to succeed, since due to the effects of Metcalfe's Law a lack of liquidity will make it almost impossible for an exchange to attract new customers, and therefore to survive.
IM effectiveness results from services enabled by new technology, and it can also be achieved when the technology facilitates transition of legacy systems, as referenced in Metcalfe's Law.
Metcalfe's Law indicates the network growth value will increase with service expansions from data, voice, and video users.
In my view, Metcalfe's Law will set the standard for excellence in our industry and for our customers in the years to come" said Ruiz.
The YottaYotta NetStorage solution allows for new economies of scale by introducing Metcalfe's Law to storage communications.
He said Yipes delivers to customers the combined benefits of Moore's Law, Gilder's Law and Metcalfe's Law, which predict exponential increases in computing power, bandwidth and network value.
It's come to be called Metcalfe's Law, and it says that networks grow in value with the square of the number of connected nodes.
But, as Metcalfe's law predicted, increased connectivity created an environment in which previously inconceivable and impossible applications suddenly became both obvious and possible.
Reducing latency and increasing bandwidth is all well and good, but just counting on Moore's and Metcalfe's Laws doesn't cut it anymore.