Joint

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Related to Midcarpal joint: wrist joint, intercarpal joint

Joint

United; coupled together in interest; shared between two or more persons; not solitary in interest or action but acting together or in unison. A combined, undivided effort or undertaking involving two or more individuals. Produced by or involving the concurring action of two or more; united in or possessing a common relation, action, or interest. To share common rights, duties, and liabilities.

joint

adj., adv. referring to property, rights or obligations which are united, undivided and shared by two or more persons or entities. Thus, a joint property held by both cannot be effectively transferred unless all owners join in the transaction. If a creditor sues to collect a joint debt, he/she must include all the debtors in the lawsuit, unless the debt is specifically "joint and several," meaning anyone of the debtors may be individually liable. Therefore, care must be taken in drafting deeds, sales agreements, promissory notes, joint venture agreements, and other documents. A joint tenancy is treated specially, since it includes the right of the survivor to get the entire property when the other dies (right of survivorship). (See: joint tenancy, joint and several, joint venture, tenancy in common)

JOINT. United, not separate; as, joint action, or one which is brought by several persons acting together; joint bond, a bond given by two or more obligors.

References in periodicals archive ?
The main advantage of the procedure over an open operative synovectomy is its ability to more effectively remove synovial tissue in the volar recesses of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. (56,57) Arthroscopic synovectomies are contraindicated in the presence of dorsal tenosynovitis, due to the risk that the portal incisions may further damage tendons that are already at risk for rupture.
[12,13] Although there is no threshold limit for distraction, but there is a correlation between increasing carpal height index and worse functional outcomes with distraction of 5-8 mm across the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints have no negative outcome.