Mile


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Related to Mile: nautical mile

MILE, measure. A length of a thousand paces, or seventeen hundred and sixty yards, or five thousand two hundred and eighty feet. It contains eight furlongs, every furlong being forty poles, and each pole sixteen feet six inches. 2 Stark. R. 89.

References in classic literature ?
I shall not go into the details of its construction--it lies out there in the desert now--about two miles from here.
"And we are making seven miles an hour," I concluded for him, as I sat with my eyes upon the distance meter.
They ascended to the foot of the first rapid, about two hundred miles, but could hear nothing of any white men being in the neighborhood.
In a few minutes the far bank, a mile away, unobtrusively came into view, and ahead and behind, the whole frozen river could be seen, with off to the left a wide-extending range of sharp-cut, snow-covered mountains.
There, a mile and a half from the frigate, a long blackish body emerged a yard above the waves.
At half-past two in the morning, the projectile was over the thirteenth lunar parallel and at the effective distance of five hundred miles, reduced by the glasses to five.
This river is situated about sixty miles south of Port St.
Then I carried the sack about a hundred yards across the grass and through the willows east of the house, to a shallow lake that was five mile wide and full of rushes -- and ducks too, you might say, in the season.
There, not more than forty or fifty miles from us, glittering like silver in the early rays of the morning sun, soared Sheba's Breasts; and stretching away for hundreds of miles on either side of them ran the great Suliman Berg.
I felt that I didn't know so well as Miles, and I took temporary refuge.
At sunrise the next day, which was 8th November, the boat had made more than one hundred miles. The log indicated a mean speed of between eight and nine miles.
This island, lying near to the eastern coast of Africa, is in the sixth degree of south latitude, that is to say, four hundred and thirty geographical miles below the equator.