milk

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The scientist and artist realised that they had much in common - they were both from similar working class backgrounds, the same age with children of a similar age, who had recently lost milk teeth for the first time.
Mrs Morgan, who lectures at the university, added that even milk teeth should be brushed morning and night.
is week a report came out which said nearly half of eight-year-olds and a third of ve-year-olds have signs of nastiness (aka decay) in their milk teeth, meanwhile one in every three 12 and 15-year-olds said they were embarrassed to smile or laugh because of the condition of their teeth.
His abrasive, direct approach caused friction; his tenure of the post at a council that never grew out of milk teeth lasted four months.
Parents are now being urged to store their child's milk teeth in a dental stem cell bank.
The Daresbury Science & Innovation Park-based firm harvests stem cells from baby milk teeth that can be used later to tackle possible disorders such as Parkinsons and Alzheimer's that run in donors' families by growing new nerve tissue from the cells.
They follow a similar deal in Jordan last November as part of the global expansion plans for the company which harvests stem cells from baby milk teeth that can be used later to tackle possible disorders such as Parkinsons and Alzheimer''s in their families by growing new nerve tissue from the cells.
Sophie Waller suffered an apparent extreme dental phobia and refused to eat, sleep or drink after her milk teeth came loose.
Sophie Waller is believed to have suffered from such an extreme fear she refused to eat, drink or speak when her milk teeth started to come loose.
Dentists have told Media Wales it is "not unusual" to have to fill three-year-old's milk teeth and that some children in the Valleys do not recognise the taste of toothpaste or know how to use a toothbrush.
And hundreds of children aged between four and six are showing such extreme signs of tooth decay that they are left without any milk teeth at all.
A report called Children's Dental Health in the UK 1993, found that 50% of children aged five to six had erosion on their milk teeth.