Mill

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Mill

One-tenth of one cent: $0.001. A mill rate is used by many localities to compute property taxes. For example, some states levy a one-time nonrecurring tax of two mills per dollar (0.2%) on the fair market value of all notes, bonds, and other obligations for payment of money that are secured by mortgage, deed of trust, or other lien on real property in lieu of all other taxes on such property.

MILL, estates. Mills are so very different and various, that it is not easy to give a definition of the term. They are used for the purpose of grinding and pulverising grain and other matters, to extract the juices of vegetables, to make various articles of manufacture. They take their names from the uses to which they are employed, hence we have paper-mills, fulling-mills, iron-mills, oil-mills, saw-mills, &c. In another respect their kinds are various; they are either fixed to the freehold or not. Those which are a part of the freehold, are either watermills, wind-mills, steam- mills, &c.; those which are not so fixed, are hand-mills, and are merely personal property. Those which are fixed, and make a part of the freehold, are buildings with machinery calculated to obtain the object proposed in their erection.
     2. It has been held that the grant of a mill; and its appurtenances, even without the land, carries the whole right of water enjoyed by the grantor, as necessary to its use, and as a necessary incident. Cro. Jac. 121, And a devise of a mill carries the land used with it, and the right to use the water. 1 Serg. & Rawle, 169; and see 5 Serg. & Rawle, 107; 2 Caine's Ca. 87; 10 Serg. & Rawle, 63; 1 Penna. R. 402; 3 N. H. Rep. 190; 6 Greenl. R. 436; Id. 154; 7 Mass. Rep. 6; 5 Shepl. 281.
     3. A mill means not merely the building, in which the business is carried on, but includes the site, the dam, and other things annexed to the freehold, necessary for its beneficial enjoyment. 3 Mass R. 280. See Vide 6 Greenl. R. 436.
     4. Whether manufacturing machinery will pass under the grant of a mill must depend mainly on the circumstances of each case. 5 Eng. C. L. R. 168; S. C. 1 Brod. & Bing. 506. In England the law appears not to be settled. 1 Bell's Com. 754, note 4, 5th ed. In this note are given the opinions of Sir Samuel Romily and Mr. Leech, on a question whether a mortgage of a piece of land on which a mill was erected, would operate as a mortgage of the machinery. Sir Samuel was clearly of opinion that such a mortgage would bind the machinery, and Mr. Leech was of a directly opposite opinion.
     5. The American law on this subject, appears not to be entirely fixed. 1 Hill. Ab. 16; 1 Bailey's R. 540; 3 Kent, Com. 440; see Amos & Fer., on Fixt., 188, et seq.; 1 Atk. 165; 1 Ves. 348; Sugd. Vend. 30; 6 John. 5; 10 Serg. & Rawle, 63; 2 Watts & Serg. 116; 6 Greenl. 157; 20 Wend. 636; 1 H. Bl. 259, note; 17 S. & R. 415; 10 Amer. Jur. 58; 1 Misso. R. 620; 3 Mason, 464; 2 Watts & S. 390. Vide 15 Vin. Ab. 398; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t. 6 Cowen, 677.

MILL, money. An imaginary money, of which ten are equal to one cent, one hundred equal to a dime, and one thousand equal to a dollar. There is no coin of this denomination. Vide Coin; Money.

References in classic literature ?
Behold me, on my gallant grey, bending at the side of Miss Mills, with my hand upon the carriage door!
If you would like to call, I am sure papa would be happy to see you.' What could I do but invoke a silent blessing on Miss Mills's head, and store Miss Mills's address in the securest corner of my memory!
Then Miss Mills benignantly dismissed me, saying, 'Go back to Dora!' and I went; and Dora leaned out of the carriage to talk to me, and we talked all the rest of the way; and I rode my gallant grey so close to the wheel that I grazed his near fore leg against it, and 'took the bark off', as his owner told me, 'to the tune of three pun' sivin' - which I paid, and thought extremely cheap for so much joy.
At last, arrayed for the purpose at a vast expense, I went to Miss Mills's, fraught with a declaration.
I was shown into a room upstairs, where Miss Mills and Dora were.
Miss Mills was very glad to see me, and very sorry her papa was not at home: though I thought we all bore that with fortitude.
Miss Mills was more than usually pensive when Dora, going to find her, brought her back; - I apprehend, because there was a tendency in what had passed to awaken the slumbering echoes in the caverns of Memory.
When, under cover of the night, I flew to Miss Mills, whom I saw by stealth in a back kitchen where there was a mangle, and implored Miss Mills to interpose between us and avert insanity.
Their husbands, you know, are the two principal stockholders in the Mills. Like all the rest of humanity, those two women are tied to the machine, but they are so tied that they sit on top of it."
Dear Miss Mills, tell me what to do, let me help you, I 'm ready for anything," said Polly, very humbly, for her own troubles looked so small and foolish beside the stern hardships which had nearly had so tragical an end, that she felt heartily ashamed of herself, and quite burned to atone for them.
Miss, Mills stopped to stroke the fresh cheek opposite, to smile, and say, "Then, Polly, I think I 'll ask you to go in and say a friendly word to my little girl.
"Yes, Miss Mills lets me have a little room up stairs, and there I have my cat and bird, my piano and my posy pots, and live like a queen.