Miscegenation


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Related to Miscegenation: social Darwinism

Miscegenation

Mixture of races. A term formerly applied to marriage between persons of different races. Statutes prohibiting marriage between persons of different races have been held to be invalid as contrary to the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

References in periodicals archive ?
Collins's miscegenation story refutes the myth that black men or women's lack of sexual virtue will pollute the body politic.
Instead, Faulkner's strategic employment of grammatically conflated prose allows us to realize that Ike sees a geographic, economic, and cultural miscegenation, accomplished largely by railroads and the economic networks which they both engender and represent, in which the distinct South is folded into a blurry metropolis--a metropolis in no sense Midwestern--"until no man has time to say which one is which nor cares.
However, a desire for miscegenation and homosexual desire - clearly a non-revolutionary desire in the logics of Soul on Ice - become logically and negatively conflated in Cleaver's account, as both are moments that would seem to challenge easy notions of desire and preset boundaries of the self.
Joubert, in attempting to research and write a five-part journalistic essay and a play about Sugar-Groove, actually produces a saga about an authentic American folk hero who experiences the full effects of miscegenation from his birth to his Christ-like death and burial in the mountains.
From generation to generation, the continued miscegenation between diverse peoples made describing them more and more complex, and in fact, precise descriptions and classifications became difficult--if not impossible by the maturation of colonial New Spain, as many Spaniards applied names to describe mixed peoples out of mockery, scorn, and contempt wherein some of the Afro-Mexican names had zoological origins that could mean mule, coyote, wolf, or cow to apply to human beings.
Race in Brazil is a profoundly complex issue because of the extraordinary range of skin colour, which is the legacy of generations of miscegenation and because each shade has a different social weight in the Brazilian context.
To those interested in the topic of miscegenation, however, such large claims are unnecessary.
Fears of miscegenation also played a role in popular outrage about cocaine, which was said to make blacks uppity and prone to violence against whites, especially sexual assault.
The usual pious mob declares that civil marriage must remain a heterosexual privilege, and the editorial notes, "These arguments, uncomfortably similar to those raised in resistance to repealing miscegenation laws a few decades ago, cannot obscure the entrenched anti-gay bigotry underlying much of the public dialogue.
He first delineates "five basic issues involved in the question of miscegenation in the New World" (70) and then further divides the works discussed into those whose primary emphasis is on interracial sex and interracial relationships and those that are more interested in the new races being formed in the New World.
He discusses works by Maya Angelou, Rick Bragg, Jimmy Carter, Bessie and Sadie Delaney, Willie Morris, Pauli Murray, Lillian Smith, Thomas Wolfe, William Styron, Zora Neale Hurston, and other writers and their experiences with miscegenation, racial oppression and harassment, poverty, segregated rail travel, college education, and the Appalachian view of home, ending with an overview of works by Native Americans, Asians, and Latinos from the South.
In Johnson's work, miscegenation, defined by David Croly in 1864 as the "mingling of diverse races" leading to "legitimate unions between whites and blacks" proved synechdochic to interracial relations (65).