monster

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Related to Monsters: Mythical monsters
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MONSTER, physiology, persons. An animal which has a conformation contrary to the order of nature. Dunglison's Human Physiol. vol. 2, p. 422.
     2. A monster, although born of a woman in lawful wedlock, cannot inherit. Those who have however the essential parts of the human form and have merely some defect of coformation, are capable of inheriting, if otherwise qualified. 2 Bl. Com. 246; 1 Beck's Med. Jurisp. 366; Co. Litt. 7, 8; Dig. lib. 1, t. 5, l. 14; 1 Swift's Syst. 331 Fred. Code, Pt. 1, b. 1, t. 4, s. 4.
     3. No living human birth, however much it may differ from human shape, can be lawfully destroyed. Traill. Med. Jur. 47, see Briand, Med. Leg. 1ere part. c. 6, art. 2, Sec. 3; 1 Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 402-405.

References in classic literature ?
"Just imagine such a monster anywhere in this country, and at once we could get a sort of idea of the 'worms,' which possibly did frequent the great morasses which spread round the mouths of many of the great European rivers."
"Well, our antique monster must have been mighty heavy, and the distances he had to travel were long and the ways difficult.
'Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too!
'It's a fabulous monster!' the Unicorn cried out, before Alice could reply.
"On earth there is nothing greater than I: it is I who am the regulating finger of God"--thus roareth the monster. And not only the long-eared and short-sighted fall upon their knees!
"No; there were some, but the monster has eaten them all.
I say ship of the line, because the shape of the monster suggested the idea- the hull of one of our seventy-four might convey a very tolerable conception of the general outline.
After two or three days the monster's strength will be so far exhausted that you will be able to come near him.
That sea monster was no other than the enormous Shark, which has often been mentioned in this story and which, on account of its cruelty, had been nicknamed "The Attila of the Sea" by both fish and fishermen.
In every place of great resort the monster was the fashion.
The monster had fled up the gutter-spout like a cat or a convict who--everybody knew that also--would scale the very skies, with the help of a gutter-spout....No doubt Erik was at that time contemplating some decisive step against Raoul, but he had been wounded and had escaped to turn against poor Christine instead.
what if this little monster were to be carried to them to suckle?