Moorov doctrine

Moorov doctrine

in the law of evidence of the law of Scotland, the doctrine, taking its name from the first case in which it was enunciated, that corroboration can be found in cases, especially (but not necessarily) sexual cases, from the proof of two uncorroborated incidents related closely in time and in their nature. Thus, a man can be convicted on the uncorroborated evidence of two rape victims providing the interval between the two attacks is not excessive.
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A cornerstone of the Crown's prosecution of Anderson was the use of the Moorov doctrine, which commonly features in sex cases in Scotland, where evidence from one witness can corroborate that of another because of a link in time, circumstances and character of the alleged offending.
Under a legal precedent called the Moorov doctrine, at least two separate but similar crimes must be proved, if the only witness is the accuser.
This was allowed in Scots law under a legal device called the Moorov Doctrine, which means prosecutors can prove a case where there is no direct corroborative evidence.
It becomes a stated case, and the "Moorov Doctrine" remains is constant use, particularly by policewomen.
His lawyer said it was due to Moorov doctrine but didn't explain what it meant.
Prosecutors tried to use the Moorov doctrine to establish a case - a legal mechanism which applies where two or more separate offences are closely connected in time and circumstances.
But Mrs Buchan claims the Moorov doctrine used to convict suspects of sex abuse "is flawed".