moral science

(redirected from Moral sciences)
See: casuistry
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References in classic literature ?
It may be fun to you," said Miss Lindsay sharply; "but it is not very creditable to me, as Miss Wilson said just now, to take a prize in moral science and then have to write down that I don't know how to behave myself.
That's because you don't know as much moral science as I, though I never took a prize in it.
All that they knew was, that they spoke of a glory to be revealed,--a wondrous something yet to come, wherein their soul rejoiced, yet knew not why; and though it be not so in the physical, yet in moral science that which cannot be understood is not always profitless.
For instance, schools that adhere to the CBSC Indian curriculum give students the option to study moral sciences instead of Islamic studies, with the same applicable for languages.
Pyschologization," defined as the entrance of psychological vocabulary and explanatory schemes into fields that are not traditional theoretical and practical terrains of psychology, has globally spread into almost every societal field, including companies, advertising, culture, politics, and our social and family lives, argues De Vos (philosophy and moral sciences, Ghent U.
Both political and moral sciences therefore exist; I say sciences in the plural as man in society can be considered in different ways.
The sole new item in WIC from these years is an extract from the minutes of a meeting of the Moral Sciences Club in 1912 reporting that Wittgenstein talked on 'What is Philosophy?
This book is an examination of two views on the nature of political and social reform in the early Victorian age: that of William Whewell, a Cambridge professor of moral philosophy, master of Trinity College, and creator of the natural and moral sciences triposes at Cambridge, on the one hand, and that of John Stuart Mill, the utilitarian philosophical radical, on the other.
The Academy of Social, Political and Moral Sciences of the Institute of Chile is honored in welcoming today Professor Dr.
Braithwaite worked to admit women to membership of Cambridge University and thus to its degrees; his second wife, Margaret Masterman, whom he married in 1932, was a Newnham graduate who had read Modern and Medieval Languages and Moral Sciences.
Brearley, the Cambridge graduate with a first in Classics and a 2:1 in Moral Sciences, and Botham, whose morals were often the subject of lurid front page tabloid headlines.
This is a task and a teaching that, in my opinion, should not be denied to students of economics, but it must be done in the interdisciplinary field in which economics cannot work separately from moral sciences.