racism

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23) The appearance of the word Negrophobia is recent, and it is hardly found in dictionaries.
18) The upshot of this racial asymmetry--the mulatto's deracialization coupled with Crispulo's amplified racial marking--is that along with the reader's racial radar, the locus of debate and racial angst shifts from Affo-Antillean bodies to that of the perceptibly distinct "Jewish" slave trader, and Negrophobia is supplanted by Judeophobia.
Fanon describes racialization as a kind of "collective catharsis" in which the generalized anxiety and aggression of the colonizer supplies itself with a "channel" or "outlet" for affective relief through negrophobia (2008: 124).
Montgomery's quarrel with the cinema world is that it evokes and invokes Yoruba deities and ritual music but refuses to acknowledge these Yoruba sources because of the negrophobia afflicted critical mass of movie goers.
That Phillis Wheatley Peters could not make her professional connections work for her in publishing a second volume of poems illustrates the stranglehold of white racism and negrophobia in the young United States.
Among Fanon's major innovations were his theories of the psychosocial basis of black Antillean negrophobia and of the relationship between colonial violence, racism, and sexuality.
Yunior's writing is nevertheless with a difference, as it becomes a force for unsettling racist discourses and totalitarian power, yet he fails to turn to explicitly and critically question how his virulent sexism and negrophobia implicates him within Beli's history and trauma, which essentially makes possible the novel he authors.
From nationalism, they passed to chauvinism, negrophobia and finally, to racism.
RANDALL KENNEDY, RACE, CRIME, AND THE LAW 159 (1998); see also JODY DAVID ARMOUR, NEGROPHOBIA AND REASONABLE RACISM: THE HIDDEN COSTS OF BEING BLACK IN AMERICA 13-14 (1997) (discussing a "black tax").
Written in the aftermath of the betrayal of the black Cuban War soldier and the upsurge of Negrophobia in the wake of the Spanish-American War, in 1899 Sutton Griggs, a Nashville Baptist minister originally from Texas, published his first novel, Imperium in Imperio: A Study of the Negro Problem.
In a passage strangely reminiscent of Darius James's Negrophobia, McIntyre falls asleep and finds himself stymied by a talking lawn jockey; the jive-talking iron man is evidently symbolic of an increasingly intolerable racial burden:
When Nia talks about her love for "red ribbons" (56), once denied her by her mother who thought Nia "too black to wear red" (56), she exposes the painful, maternal Negrophobia inculcated by white supremacist culture.