neologism

(redirected from Neologisms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
See: jargon
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The word Trumpism itself is an example of this phenomenon but it's only the tip of the iceberg; Oxford Dictionaries has collected citations for more than 50 different neologisms derived from Trump's name.
Besides these, another neologism has been the talk of the town these days following Moon Jae-in government's first reshuffle of foreign mission chiefs, 16 of them were brought from outside of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
These neologisms in the Lexinary define those things we probably never thought to name: our secrets.
Among the sources of rare words, the most important ones, considering their abundance, are the neologisms of the 1920s and 1930s.
Ma'arav and Izavon are a favorite pair of Ezekiel's neologisms.
Refugees were on many minds in other ways, too: The Austrian No 2 word was "Intelligenzfluechtling", or "refugee from intelligence" - a neologism for someone dumb, probably also born of the migrant crisis.
It sometimes feels that too much--theories and references, especially--and too many neologisms are packed into each chapter, making it hard to actually summarize the book.
What I mean by these neologisms is the severe, intractable opposition especially by those republicans in Congress to anything having to do with President Obama.
His poetic language admits archaisms and he also uses neologisms.
Neologisms may be justified, and a revolutionary theory may require multiple neologisms, but when they are used they should be sufficiently clear.
In addition to the ongoing phonological and morphosyntactic shifts that mark the transition from medieval to modern Spanish, this period also witnessed enrichment of the Spanish lexicon through the incorporation of numerous neologisms in the form of lexical and semantic borrowings from living and dead languages with which Spanish was in contact, as well as through the coining of new words by means of its various derivational resources.
Early screenings show Barn's innate ability to propagate neologisms.