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Therefore the objective of this experiment was to examine the effect of probiotics supplementation on growth performance nutrient retention and digestive enzyme activities of broilers fed diets with different nutrient density.
To date, there has been no consensus on a standard definition for nutrient-density or quantitative approach to depict the nutrient density of foods.
Nutrient density is an area of our diets that requires attention.
The public health implications of farming methods that restore food nutrient density are tantalizing.
As Figure 1 shows, if nutrient density (nutrient/unit energy) is the basis for comparison, then lean red meat is the optimal choice within this food group providing all the key nutrients ascribed to the group, being the outstanding contributor to bioavailable iron and zinc and a good contributor to protein, vitamin B12 and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.
Remineralization is the process of replenishing these lost minerals and trace elements to the soil and ultimately to the food supply, as it is linked to increased nutrient density of food
It's imperative, therefore, that the food-service department be run by someone who has the nutrition knowledge required to modify menus based on the Department of Health and Human Services and United States Department of Agriculture's Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, which tackle cardiac wellness, hypertension, nutrient density, fiber intake, nutrient status of aging Americans, adequate calcium intake to help prevent bone fractures, etc.
During the first phase, birds are growing and increasing in production, and at this time the feed formulation is at maximum nutrient density.
After establishing the levels of nutrients required in the supplement to meet the micronutrient gaps in the diet, supplement options were identified and compared based on their ability to provide the required nutrient density, cost, feasibility of delivery, acceptability, and serving volume.
In addition, permit on case-by-case basis health claims for foods that meet neither a minimum nutrient contribution requirement nor a nutrient density standard if such claims would inform consumers of healthier substitutes for foods in their diets.
Excessive intake of regular pop either contributes excessive energy to the diet leading to obesity or decreases intake of foods with a higher nutrient density leading to deficient nutrient intake.