occupation

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occupation

n. 1) fairly permanent trade, profession, employment, business, or means of livelihood. 2) possession of real property or use of a thing.

occupation

1 a mode of original acquisition of property. It is done by taking a thing, intending to be its owner. Ownership of wild animals is obtained in this way, a hunter becoming the owner of wild animals killed and taken. Goods lost, abandoned and ownerless (called bona vacantia) fall to the Crown. It is a criminal offence not to take found things to a police station. It has a similar meaning in International Law.
2 living in a dwelling house or otherwise being in possession of land or buildings. The occupier of premises may attract OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY.

OCCUPATION. Use or tenure; as, the house is in the occupation of A B. A trade, business or mystery; as the occupation of a printer. Occupancy. (q.v.)
     2. In another sense occupation signifies a putting out of a man's freehold in time of war. Co. Litt. s. 412. See Dependency; Possession.

References in periodicals archive ?
If the mix of occupations were held fixed, the average wage would have declined 0.6 percent due to declines in within-occupation wages.
In each state, increases in the share of employment in higher-wage occupations pushed the average wage up, but in Ohio a 3.5 percent decline in the within-occupation wage was enough to make the average wage in the state fall.
Once we created this unique data set for 464 occupations, we combined the different components into a future labor shortages index.
Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, some of the occupations that appear to be the tightest presently are occupations that do not require a bachelor's degree.
In recent years, many macro-labor models of tasks and occupations have equated workers' occupations with their skill levels (see the review of Acemoglu and Autor, 2011).
Workers with a professional degree (78.6 percent) were much more likely to hold a certification or license than those with a master's (42.9 percent) or doctoral (54.6 percent) degree, probably because many workers with a professional degree are employed in legal occupations or in healthcare occupations, where obtaining a license is common.
The chart shows selected occupations that have more than one-third of workers ages 55 and older in which BLS projects average to much faster than average employment growth over the decade for workers of all ages.
Management Occupations $51.34 $106,776 $28.22 $56,685
All of these considerations generally make it impossible to definitively set a single, minimum level of education required for each occupation. Instead, the available data should be used as a guide to generalize common education requirements of occupations.
The measures proposed here tease out the significant differences between occupations that can make understanding the match between field of study and occupation upon graduation meaningful.
To support this idea, Leive cites the following: Pierce's [28] concept of cooccupation, an occupation that requires synchrony within the occupational patterns of a cohabitating group; Zemke and Clark [14], emphasizing the crucial role of the environment in the construction of occupation, especially the family environment for children; Esdaile and Olson [29], noting that if occupational problems occur, the family dynamic is affected, including the orchestration of caregiver-child cooccupations and other familial roles; and Evans and Rodger [30], noting that the degree of synchronization between the caregiver and child impacts the construction of everyday occupations.

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