official

(redirected from Official capacity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

official

1) adj. an act, document or anything sanctioned or authorized by a public official or public agency. The term can also apply to an organizational act or product which is authorized by the organization, such as an Official Boy Scout knife or emblem, an official warranty, membership card, or set of rules. 2) n. a public officer or governmental employee who is empowered to exercise judgment. 3) n. an officer of a corporation or business. (See: officer)

official

adjective accredited, approved, assured, attested, authenticated, authoritative, ceremonious, certain, certified, conclusive, correct, decided, definite, dependable, endorsed, established, formal, guaranteed, indisputable, legitimate, licensed, magisterial, officiary, proper, proven, publicus, reliable, sanctioned, to be depended on, to be trusted, trustworthy, undeniable, unequivocal, valid, verified, worthy of confidence
Associated concepts: official act, official bond, official busiiess, official misconduct, official notice, official proceeding, official record

official

noun administrative head, administrator, executive, executive officer, functionary, head of government, leader, leader of affairs, office bearer, officer, overseer, person in authority, person reeponsible, public office holder, superintendent, supervisor
Associated concepts: public official
See also: actual, certain, choate lien, civic, clerk, ex officio, factual, fixed, formal, functionary, genuine, incumbent, indubious, legitimate, magistrate, notary public, officer, politician, rightful, valid

OFFICIAL, civil and canon laws. In the ancient civil law, the person who was the minister of, or attendant upon a magistrate, was called the official.
     2. In the canon law, the person to whom the bishop generally commits the charge of his spiritual jurisdiction, bears this name. Wood's Inst. 30, 505; Merl. Repert. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
join our sister circuits in holding that an individual official of a foreign state acting in his official capacity is the 'agency or instrumentality' of the state, and is thereby protected by the FSIA.
The high court dismissed the claim of constitutional violation as the visit was not done in an official capacity.
His client was the President of the United States acting in his official capacity.
Government attendees also should understand the difference between attendance in an official capacity, or in a personal status.
The personal representative of the estate of a pretrial detainee who committed suicide while incarcerated brought an action against a sheriff, in his official capacity, asserting claims for deliberate indifference to the detainee's medical needs in violation of [section] 1983, negligent training and supervision of jail employees, and vicarious liability for the employees' negligence.
Meadowdale Middle, in Bedlington, has an official capacity of 400 pupils but has averaged more than 480 in recent years and currently has 500 students.
While no official capacity figures were released, officials have indicated that it will be the company's largest production line.
The document further indicates that conferees may participate in their official capacity as speakers and panel members at ASMC training events as long as there is DoD benefit and as long as the presentation does not detract from readiness.
The lawyer and the complainant and a person from the Bar will then participate in a mediation meeting so that both the lawyer and complainant will have the opportunity to vent their concerns to someone in an official capacity.
This note discusses these changes and highlights the fundamental differences between accepting travel expenses from non-government sources when speaking in an official capacity and in an unofficial capacity.
Bangladesh has 65 jails across the country to house the prison population, which includes about 2,300 women, even though the official capacity of the system was for just 24,997 prisoners in 2001.
Nobody even bothered to ask a prime minister whether he would visit the Shinto shrine in his personal or official capacity.