old age

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OLD AGE. This needs no definition. Sometimes old age is the cause of loss of memory and of the powers of the mind, when the party may be found non compos mentis. See Aged witness; Senility.

References in classic literature ?
First, they shone like silver, then like gold; and when they laid them on the heads of the old people, each flower became a golden crown.
She lived twenty-nine years after his death, such active years until toward the end, that you never knew where she was unless you took hold of her, and though she was frail henceforth and ever growing frailer, her housekeeping again became famous, so that brides called as a matter of course to watch her ca'ming and sanding and stitching: there are old people still, one or two, to tell with wonder in their eyes how she could bake twenty-four bannocks in the hour, and not a chip in one of them.
This confession, and the look that accompanied it, touched the ready sympathies of the two old people in the right place.
I like to hear about the old people of the old days.
The old people in the nurseries took no notice of them, and the holluschickie kept to their own grounds, and the babies had a beautiful playtime.
When he returned from his military service Jean-Pierre Bacadou found the old people very much aged.
Some old people keep young at heart in spite of wrinkles and gray hairs, can sympathize with children's little cares and joys, make them feel at home, and can hide wise lessons under pleasant plays, giving and receiving friendship in the sweetest way.
But I reckon she is pretty old, and old people don't often outlive the cautious pace of the professional detective when he has got his clues together and is out on his still-hunt.
but since the young man has returned from his travels, he has been so much--much courted--nay, by the old people, I mean--and the girls beckon him about so- -and it's Mr.
Our part of the valley now appeared nearly deserted by its inhabitants, Kory-Kory, his aged father, and a few decrepit old people, being all that were left.
I resolved to be off forthwith, and try and establish myself in some decent occupation, without dancing attendance any longer upon the caprices of these eccentric old people, and running the risk of being made a genius of in the end.
But neither of the old people had arrived, and it was not till the sons were almost tired of waiting that their parents entered.