Omnibus

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Omnibus

[Latin, For all; containing two or more independent matters.] A term frequently used in reference to a legislative bill comprised of two or more general subjects that is designed to compel the executive to approve provisions that he or she would otherwise reject but that he or she signs into law to prevent the defeat of the entire bill.

Laws governing the Federal Budget are typically omnibus bills; for example, the Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996 (110 Stat. 1321).

References in periodicals archive ?
Horse-Drawn Cabs and Omnibuses in Paris: The Idea of Circulation and the Business of Public Transit.
(11) Nicholas Papayanis, Horse Drawn Cabs and Omnibuses in Paris: The Idea of Circulation and the Business of Public Transit (Baton Rouge/London: Louisiana State University Press, 1996) 96-97.
Fortunately, he's been kept in print rather steadily since the Firbank revival in the late forties, when New Directions brought out two omnibuses (still available) that contain his eight novels.