oral

(redirected from Oral contraceptives)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

oral

adjective announced, articulated, audible, by word of mouth, communicated, enunciated, expressed, expressed in words, phonic, said, said aloud, sounded, spoken, spoken out loud, told, unwritten, uttered, verbal, vocal, vocalized, voiced
Associated concepts: nuncupative will, oral contract, oral testimony, statute of frauds
See also: language, nuncupative, parol, verbal

ORAL. Something spoken in contradistinction to something written; as oral evidence, which is evidence delivered verbally by a witness,

References in periodicals archive ?
Pregnancy attributable to interaction between tetracycline and oral contraceptives.
The study's authors said oral contraceptive use has already prevented 200,000 cases of ovarian cancer and 100,000 deaths worldwide since the pill was introduced almost 50 years ago.
The levels of total testosterone were similar in anorectic women who received oral contraceptives and those who did not.
Of 12 girls aged 12-18 years included in the study, 5 received a combination oral contraceptive with 20 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 1 mg of norethindrone acetate for 12 months and 7 received one with 35 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 1 mg norethindrone for the same duration.
Drug interactions between oral contraceptives and antibiotics.
They found that SHBG values in "continued users" of oral contraceptives were four times higher than in women who had never taken the Pill.
There are a lot of questions that are not being asked about the impact of taking oral contraceptives on women's health," says Christine Hitchcock, a researcher at the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR) in Vancouver.
benefit of using oral contraceptives, whether you are HIV-negative or positive.
They also found the risk was higher in the women who used oral contraceptives before the age of 30, women who were diagnosed with breast cancer under 40 and women who first used the Pill before 1975.
A small number of women who use combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and antibiotics at the same time may be at risk for pregnancy, an extensive review of studies of the impact of antibiotic treatment on oral contraceptive effectiveness has shown.
Women who took oral contraceptives before 1975, and whose mother or sister had breast cancer between 1944 and 1952, have triple the likelihood of getting breast cancer as compared with similar women who didn't take the pill, according to a study in the Oct.