Orders


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ORDERS. Rules made by a court or other competent jurisdiction. The formula is generally in those words: It is ordered, &c.
     2. Orders also signify the instructions given by the owner to the captain or commander of a ship which he is to follow in the course of the voyage.

References in classic literature ?
An officer with a torch went before the horses, and gave orders at every post to let them pass.
Give the postilion orders to conceal the carriage in one of the side avenues.
Normal truth is a different order, and a lesser order, of truth.
This is the order of truth that obtains, not for the universe, but for the live things in it if they for a little space will endure ere they pass.
On the evening of the last day's march an order had been received that the commander in chief would inspect the regiment on the march.
Thus it is peremptorily his Majesty's orders that the whole French inhabitants of these Districts be removed; and I am, through his Majesty's goodness, directed to allow you liberty to carry off your money and household goods, as many as you can without discommoding the vessels you go in.
The Emperor struck a bell and gave a few orders to the young officer who immediately answered it.
Then, turning toward the door, and seeing that the young officer was waiting for his last orders, he said.
De Wardes was in the interior of the Hotel de Ville, engaged in attending to the execution of some orders given by De Guiche.
The inferior officers of the Order were thus dressed, ever since their use of white garments, similar to those of the knights and esquires, had given rise to a combination of certain false brethren in the mountains of Palestine, terming themselves Templars, and bringing great dishonour on the Order.
And your State, while the wise order which has now been prescribed continues to prevail in her, will be the greatest of States, I do not mean to say in reputation or appearance, but in deed and truth, though she number not more than a thousand defenders.
The third, to conduct my thoughts in such order that, by commencing with objects the simplest and easiest to know, I might ascend by little and little, and, as it were, step by step, to the knowledge of the more complex; assigning in thought a certain order even to those objects which in their own nature do not stand in a relation of antecedence and sequence.