Pandects

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Pandects

see CORPUS JURIS CIVILIS.

PANDECTS, civil law. The name of an abridgment or compilation of the civil law, made by order of the emperor Justinian, and to which he gave the force of law. It is also known by the name of Digest. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
(25.) Lawrence F Bernstein, 'The Bibliography of Music in Conrad Gesner's Pandectae (1548)', Acta Musicologica, 45 (1973): 119-63 at 155 [entry 235].
Conrad Gessner's Mithridates (1555) is one of the smaller works of the Swiss polymath (1516-1565), perhaps better known for his encyclopedic Pandectae (1549), his Historia plantarum (1541), and his Historia animalium (1551-1558).
In some prefatory remarks to the Pandectae locorum communium Foxe enquired: 'what can poets, what can historians, what can rhetoricians, and orators [...] provide by their art without memory [...]?'.
American legal science was strongly influenced by the German Pandectists, whose work consisted in the conceptual systematization of principles they discovered in their study of the Roman civil law Digest (the Pandectae) and eventually culminated in the promulgation of the German Civil Code of 1896 (the BGB).
Segar's modern editor makes suggestions about his possible sources among classical and Renaissance writers but adds, 'one cannot tell whether he went directly to the works of the authors or used compilations'.(1) It is in fact possible to identify one work of Renaissance scholarship on which Segar drew extensively: the Pandectae triumphales of Francois Modius (Frankfurt, 1586).(2) The title of Segar's third book and the prefatory summary of its subject matter adopt the phraseology of Modius's title page, which reads, 'Pandectae triumphales, siue, .
He also authored a work on miscellaneous subjects (Pandectae), which seems to have centred around questions of language and literature (Gel.