Pandects


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Pandects

see CORPUS JURIS CIVILIS.

PANDECTS, civil law. The name of an abridgment or compilation of the civil law, made by order of the emperor Justinian, and to which he gave the force of law. It is also known by the name of Digest. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Work on the Pandects, in all likelihood abruptly interrupted in May 1362 when diplomatic relations between Pisa and Florence were severed, (9) was probably carried out during a time when the collaboration of the Calabrian monk with the author of the Decameron had been suspended; it is hypothesised that the latter's knowledge of the Pandects had been mediated by the former.
(28.) See generally MANFRED NATHAN, THE COMMON LAW OF SOUTH AFRICA: A TREATISE BASED ON VOET'S COMMENTARIES ON THE PANDECTS, WITH REFERENCES TO THE LEADING ROMAN-DUTCH AUTHORITIES, SOUTH AFRICAN DECISIONS, AND STATUTORY ENACTMENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA (1904).
The scholars who were analyzing and writing commentaries on the Pandects were training students who became a body of legal technicians who spread their program throughout Europe.
Of Geonget's three parts, the first is on the legal definitions and implications of perplexity, or antinomy, including discussion of Roman law, the Pandects, Montaigne, Rabelais, and twenty pages on Martin Guerre.
and trans., The Selective Voet being the Commentary on the Pandects [Paris Edition of 1829] by Johannes Voet [l647-1713], 8 vols.
To say Latin "Bible" is to mis-speak because pandects or works with all of the biblical books gathered together in one place were rare.
(30) The main sources referred to here are Hugo Grotius, The Jurisprudence of Holland, first published in Dutch in 1631, which went into many editions and 'at once took rank as a legal classic': R W Lee, 'Preface' in Hugo Grotius, The Jurisprudence of Holland (R W Lee trans, 1926 ed) vii, vii [trans of: Inleiding tot de Hollandsche Rechtsgeleertheyd]; and Johannes Voet, Commentary on the Pandects. Voet's compilation of Roman law with commentaries was available in Latin editions from the end of the 17th century (the edition referred to here is Johannes Voet, The Selective Voet Being the Commentary on the Pandects (Percival Gane trans, 1956 ed) [trans of: Commentarius ad Pandectas]).
Johannes Voet, l The Selective Voet, Being The Commentary on the pandects 98, 101 (P.
Goethe once observed that the ius civile, or Roman civil law, was like "a diving duck which hides itself from time to time but never wholly disappears and always comes to the fore again."(21) Certainly, when the scholar Trebonianus passed the completed Pandects to Justinian in December of 533 A.D., he preserved not only the ius civile but also the natural law philosophy and other traditions of ancient Rome.(22) I argue for a reclamation of that inheritance and a recrudescence of the uniquely Roman natural law doctrine of promise-keeping.