holding company

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Holding Company

A corporation that limits its business to the ownership of stock in and the supervision of management of other corporations.

A holding company is organized specifically to hold the stock of other companies and ordinarily owns such a dominant interest in the other company or companies that it can dictate policy. Holding companies must comply with the federal antitrust laws that proscribe the secret and total acquisition of the stock of one corporation by another, since this would lessen competition and create a Monopoly.

holding company

n. a company, usually a corporation, which is created to own the stock of other corporations, thereby often controlling the management and policies of all of them.

holding company

a company that controls, usually through a majority shareholding, another company or companies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nonetheless, the decision should result in fewer cases in which parent companies are held liable under CERCLA for the actions of their subsidiaries.
It's a severe blow to the plaintiffs, who had hoped to avoid the effect of Dow Corning's bankruptcy by reaching the solvent parent companies.
The exchange ratio 1:1 is based on detailed analyses of historical differences in the market values of the Parent Companies as well as the underlying differences in value among the Parent Companies, in which present differences in liquid assets and expected future tax payments were considered.
In the suit, the students allege they were defrauded by their school and its parent companies, the Art Institutes International, Inc.
The law suit against the Art Institute of Houston and its parent companies charges that the school knowingly mislead these pupils to believe they were receiving a valuable post-secondary education as well as skills which would lead to subsequent employment.
As a result of the business growth and diversification, the two parent companies agreed to change the ownership structure of YHP in 1983, at which time HP became the majority owner of the company.
In a steadily growing market, the new company can better respond to the changes and opportunities created by privatization and deregulation, thanks to the complementary product ranges, geographic scope and R&D capabilities of its parent companies.
Shareholders of both parent companies will consider and vote on the proposed transaction at separate meetings to be held on Dec.