baldness

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Hair follicles at the back and sides of the head don't have DHT receptors, which is why sufferers of so-called male pattern baldness tend to be left with the classic 'horseshoe' of hair.
Most common in men, male pattern baldness also affects some women and is usually more noticeable after a woman has been through the menopause.
What we've found is promising, though we haven't yet shown it is effective for male pattern baldness," said Dr.
Once male or female pattern baldness kicks in, the tufts lose hairs and the scalp develops bald spots.
M2 EQUITYBITES-July 29, 2015-Cytori Therapeutics announces US FDA conditional IDE approval for clinical trial of technology to treat female and early male pattern baldness
M2 PHARMA-July 29, 2015-Cytori Therapeutics announces US FDA conditional IDE approval for clinical trial of technology to treat female and early male pattern baldness
Studies show that men are more likely to lose their hair than women, mostly due to male pattern baldness.
OTCQB: REPCF) announced publication of a University of Calgary paper, with co-authors from Kyoto University and the University of North Carolina, that "further validates" the company's ongoing clinical research using dermal sheath cup (DSC) cells to reverse the effects of pattern baldness.
Men with a certain type of male pattern baldness in their 40s may be at increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer later in life, suggests a study published online Sept.
ISLAMABAD -- Male pattern baldness is linked to an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but only if it's on the top/crown of the head, a new study has revealed.
The most common cause is hereditary male pattern baldness, caused by oversensitivity of hair follicles to the male hormone testosterone.
Researchers from the University of Tokyo's Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases analysed six studies on male pattern baldness and coronary heart disease conducted between 1993 and 2008 with nearly 40,000 participants in the United States and Europe.