Pedlars


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PEDLARS. Persons who travel about the country with merchandise, for the purpose of selling it. They are obliged under the laws of perhaps all the states to take out licenses, and to conform to the regulations which those laws establish.

References in classic literature ?
The pedlar strained his eyes through the twilight, and could just discern the horseman now far ahead on the village road.
On reaching this point, the pedlar no longer saw the man on horseback, but found himself at the head of the village street, not far from a number of stores and two taverns, clustered round the meeting-house steeple.
The pedlar had never pretended to more courage than befits a man of peaceful occupation, nor could he account for his valor on this awful emergency.
Higginbotham took the pedlar into high favor, sanctioned his addresses to the pretty schoolmistress, and settled his whole property on their children, allowing themselves the interest.
Pedlars and the popular press; itinerant distribution networks in England and the Netherlands 1600-1850.
The council fears the new rules will allow pedlars to be able to move around at will in the city centre, harming legitimate traders' business and potentially giving a negative impression to tourists.
If we, as readers, are left to float, as our own wandering Pedlars, on the sea of signifiers without finding any permanent semantic mooring, Wordsworth does suggest that, language may provide a social bond, even if it does not lend itself towards a coherent philosophy or even allow us to make full sense of the phenomena of nature.
THE image of Cardiff as one of the premier shopping locations will be damaged if proposals to relax the law on street pedlars are given the green light.
While some people may still cling to a romantic view of pedlars as harmless Del Boy figures the reality is no laughing matter.
Eschewing the traditional focus of economic history on one town or region, Fontaine reconstructs the economic activities of her merchant pedlars from account books and bankruptcy records and follows wherever they lead, even across national boundaries (Frenchmen peddled in Spain; Scots in England, Scandinavia, and Poland).
PROFESSIONAL beggars earning up to pounds 300 a day and street pedlars selling goods at vastly inflated prices are being targeted in a police crackdown.