peerage

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Besides, old Soap-Suds was sick enough at not getting his peerage last year; he'd sack me by wire if I lost him it with such lunacy as this.
It was quite true that he had spoken of this Lochmaben peerage as a new creation, and of the heir to it in a fashion only applicable to Alick Carruthers.
In the midst of this Round Table of beggary, Clopin Trouillefou,--as the doge of this senate, as the king of this peerage, as the pope of this conclave,-- dominated; first by virtue of the height of his hogshead, and next by virtue of an indescribable, haughty, fierce, and formidable air, which caused his eyes to flash, and corrected in his savage profile the bestial type of the race of vagabonds.
His father had been given the baronetcy which he now enjoyed, and which, as he knew very well, might at any moment be transferred into a peerage.
In an age when huge gifts on behalf of charity was the fashionable road to the peerage, his attitude was all the more noticeable.
Miss Pink rose slowly, with a dignity that looked capable of adequately receiving--not one noble lady only, but the whole peerage of England.
I shall continue to be his friend for the sake of watching him; by that means I may render the government such signal service that they will have to make me count; for the peerage is the only thing I really care for.
He refused a baronetcy, but at length in 1883 accepted a peerage and became Lord Tennyson, the first baron of his name.
These were his triumphs, and this his rate of progress on the way to the peerage, during the first year of his life as the husband of Lady Jane.
The advice was above the courage of both the King and the age; but Bacon was advanced through various legal offices, until in 1613 he was made Attorney-General and in 1618 (two years after Shakspere's death) Lord High Chancellor of England, at the same time being raised to the peerage as Baron Verulam.
Abolish the peerage, and all the wealthy people will constitute the privileged class; instead of a hundred, you will have ten thousand, instead of removing class distinctions, you have merely widened the mischief.
In other words, she had recently been raised to the position of Lord Winwood's second wife; his lordship conferring on the bride not only the honors of the peerage, but the additional distinction of being stepmother to his three single daughters, all older than herself.