Perpetrator


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Perpetrator

A term commonly used by law enforcement officers to designate a person who actually commits a crime.

References in periodicals archive ?
He said the alleged perpetrator would be charged with aggravated rape.
And the report's author, barrister David Spicer, said despite attempting to interview some of the perpetrators he still had no idea what motivated them, or why they failed to recognise that what they were doing was wrong.
A forensic report of the pistol recovered in possession of the killed perpetrator states that the weapon was used for killing of a traffic police DSP in Azizabad and another four cops in SITE area.
It later turned out that the perpetrator was a friend and he was threatening her from another ghost account.
Why is it that the victim is the one who has to move and seek refuge, when the perpetrator carries on as normal?
The perpetrator was between 15 and 20 years old, around 1.
Martin added: "I pointed out the perpetrator straight away to the Martin market security guards but they did absolutely nothing.
We are most often aware of domestic violence when a perpetrator has become physically violent but, it does not always include physical abuse.
To determine if prior training on cyberbullying influenced school social workers' endorsement of interventions across cyberbullying severity levels for victim and perpetrator, an ANOVA was conducted.
Knowledgeable healthcare workers would know which symptoms are more serious and would lead to hospitalization, meaning more of the attention that the perpetrator desires.
organised jointly by Kenyatta University and the Nation Media Group's East African University Debate Series, Mamdani argued for decriminalisation of mass murder and drew a distinction between what he described as 'political violence' and 'criminal violence' Mamdani rejected what he termed a false divide between 'victims' and 'perpetrators', and submitted that there is a need for recognition of victims, perpetrators and bystanders as 'survivors' who have to live in peace.
In the first chapter, Jaskot sets the stage by expounding a fourfold typology of the Nazi perpetrator derived from the chronologically distinct ways the NSDAP made use of culture.