persuasion

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persuasion

noun actuation, advocacy, alignment, argument, blandishment, cajolement, cajolery, cajoling, coaxing, conversion, dissuasion, encouragement, enlistment, enticement, exhortation, incitation, incitement, inducement, influence, insistence, inveiglement, motivation, pleading, pressure, prompting, propaganda, proselytism, solicitation, suasion, winning over
See also: belief, certainty, compulsion, concept, conclusion, credence, denomination, determination, dogma, force, guidance, idea, incentive, inducement, instigation, motive, opinion, patronage, pressure, propaganda, seduction, standpoint, surety

PERSUASION. The act of influencing by expostulation or request. While the persuasion is confined within those limits which leave the mind free, it may be used to induce another to make his will, or even to make it in his own favor; but if such persuasion should so far operate on the mind of the testator, that he would be deprived of a perfectly free will, it would vitiate the instrument. 3 Serg. & Rawle, 269; 5 Serg. & Rawle, 207; 13 Serg. & Rawle, 323.

References in periodicals archive ?
If a "happy disposition" is one of the "best blessings of existence" in Emma, in Persuasion, a "disposition to .
The deaths of so many tertiary characters in Emma, the illness of others, the perils of war and the havoc of accident that hover on the edges of the novel and move to the center of Persuasion create a vision of human vulnerability and suffering that makes Sense and Sensibility's prescriptions of exertion, duty, and cheerfulness seem unrealistic.
The "'peace'" that turns the '"Navy Officers ashore " at the beginning of Persuasion did not last, however (19).
Intuition (System 1 and the affect heuristic) could be a coherent explanation for higher persuasion from the gain-framed text, comparing to the loss-framed text (Kahneman, 2003; Slovic et al.
Data indicated that participants preferring to pay by credit card did not seem to be affected by the text frames, as both the gain and the loss frames generated equivalent persuasion levels (p>0.
For those who are cash preferred payers, the text frame did affect the persuasion levels.
Preservice teachers enrolled this course being exposed to verbal persuasion and vicarious experiences had unique and richer experiences than those preservice teachers who were not enrolled this course.
Given that teacher efficacy develops in the process of teaching, two of the four sources of efficacy mentioned by Bandura (1986) are most appropriate and helpful for preservice teachers in the process of developing and increasing the sense of efficacy, namely vicarious experience and verbal persuasion.
A course was developed where preservice teachers had the opportunity of vicarious experience and verbal persuasion as sources of teacher efficacy development.
Despite the amount of attention given to dance in Austen's novels, Persuasion remains largely neglected, and for an obvious reason: it lacks the dance scenes that are so important in Austen's other works.
Though analyses of dance in Persuasion focus primarily on the social implications of not dancing, the novel's conclusion has also received some critical attention as a metaphoric representation of dance.
The structure of Persuasion employs the cotillion's complexities of time and space.