Pimp


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Pimp

In feudal England, a type of tenure by which a tenant was permitted to use real property that belonged to a lord in exchange for the performance of some service, such as providing young women for the use and pleasure of the lord.

An individual who, for a fee, supplies another individual with a prostitute for sexual purposes. To pander, or cater to the sexual desires of others in exchange for money.

Cross-references

Prostitution.

pimp

n. a person who procures a prostitute for customers or vice versa, sharing the profits of the woman's activities. Supposedly he provides protection for the prostitutes, but quite often he will threaten, brutalize, rape, cheat and induce drug addiction of his women. A pimp commits the crime of pandering. (See: prostitution, pander, panderer)

References in periodicals archive ?
The defendants then moved the body to the car of the pimp and kept it by the side of a road in UAQ.
As well as inking their name on the girl, they are also tattooing circles on the girls' bodies to let other pimps know they are owned by them.
Earlier in the session, state lawmakers approved another bill, signed into law by the governor, that allows district attorneys to prosecute pimps who even attempt to force a child into prostitution.
In many cases, former prostitutes who have now turned pimps, lure their friends or acquaintances to India on the pretext of getting them jobs and then sexually exploit them before pushing them into sex trade for huge sums.
Since the digit 39 is generally associated with pimps, most Afghans avoid accepting a mobile number, car number plate and other numbers containing the digit.
Bust of Department of Energy: Pimp and ho visit the Energy Department to make Freedom of Information Act request.
Pimp BP's little port-a-potty mistake with the Top Kill Live Feed
The film is a week in the life of Woody (Robert Cavanah), a Soho pimp, as seen through the eyes of concealed documentary cameras.
She told an intriguing tale of the field (in the manner of Van Maannen, 1988) of how when conducting street research she had been physically assaulted and verbally abused by a pimp and his entourage, who were annoyed that she would not pay him for using up his girls' time.
The sex worker is currently under police protection, claiming her Hungarian pimp had forced her to have sex with clients since March.
Kuhns sees these narrative figures as fictive stewards of truth: the book and its author, a pimp and a midwife producing a picture of culture through fiction.