depression

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Related to Postpartum Depression: postpartum psychosis

depression

noun debasement, decline, deflation, depreciation, despondence, despondency, dispiritedness, dolefulness, economic decline, gloom, lowering, lowness, maeror, sinking, slump
Associated concepts: economic depression
See also: anguish, curtailment, decrease, distress, pessimism, prostration
References in periodicals archive ?
The two preferred screening tools for PPD are the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ).
Commentary: Postpartum depression is experienced by an estimated 10-15% of postpartum women.
3% of women with diagnosed postpartum depression received an adequate trial of treatment.
The variable postpartum depression was inserted as a moderating variable in the regression model, which included the score of common mental disorders during pregnancy as a criterion variable to control for the effect of depression on the perceived stressful events.
What are the central explanations given for postpartum depression and the 'baby blues' in research from Europe, North America and the Caribbean?
Association of delivery type with postpartum depression, perceived social support and maternal attachment.
The purpose of this study is to determine whether postpartum depression at 2nd day (48hours) following childbirth as measured by EPDS scale Bengali translated version is associated with mode of delivery.
The psychologist said that besides genetics, postpartum depression is due to the added stress of becoming a mother with new responsibilities.
Provides information on resources which can help women who are suffering from postpartum depression.
The fact that fear of childbirth puts women without a history of depression at an approximately three times higher risk of postpartum depression is a new observation which may help health care professionals in recognising postpartum depression.
The new edition of This Isn't What I Expected takes the reader through a thorough examination of postpartum depression exploring every possible presentation of this illness.
Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major episode that most often emerges within 6 to 12 weeks after delivery (1,2).