Potestas


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POTESTAS, civil law. A Latin word which signifies power; authority; domination; empire. It has several meaning. 1. It signifies imperium, or the jurisdiction of magistrates. 2. The power of the father over his children, patriapotestas. 3. The authority of masters over their slaves, which makes it nearly synonymous with dominium. See Inst. 1, 9, et 12; Dig. 2, 1, 13, 1; Id. 14, 1; Id. 14, 4, 1, 4.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ma nello Spaccio Satana non c'e e la "potestas" e collegiale.
The kingpins in various institutions tend to forget French jurist Jean Bodin's dictum 'majesta est summa in civas ac subditoes legibusque salute potestas, that is 'highest power over citizens and subjects, unrestrained by law'.
"DPWH's practice of delegating implementation to local government unit is contrary to express mandate of the law and violates the legal precept Delegara potestas non potest delegari (delegated power cannot be delegated)," he said.
The Separation Between potestas ordinis and officium in Hugh of Amiens and Gerhoch of Reichersberg
En su investigacion sostenia que el Decreto de Graciano solo distinguia entre la potestas y la exe cutio o usus potestatis, es decir, entre la potestad y su ejercicio.
At 4pm canticles will be sung to Howell's Collegium Regale setting and the anthem will be Data est mihi omnes potestas by MacMillan.
Although there is some debate as to its true origins, the phrase "knowledge is power" is most often attributed to 16th-century English philosopher and statesman Sir Francis Bacon, although it appeared in his work Meditationes Sacrae in Latin ("ipsa scientia potestas est") and translates more accurately as "knowledge itself is power."