precognition

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Related to Precognitions: Precognitive dreams, Premonitions

precognition

in Scottish legal practice, a statement by a witness taken by a lawyer, his clerk or agent. It is not only taken by a person other than the witness, but it is also framed by the precognoscer, so it is never certain that it reflects the precise words of the witness. While there is no obligation to give a precognition, in criminal law matters either the prosecution or the defence or both can apply to the court to have a person precognosed on oath in front of the court.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

PRECOGNITION, Scotch law. The examination of witnesses who were present at the commission of a criminal act, upon the special circumstances attending it, in order to know whether there is ground for a trial, and to serve for direction to the prosecutor. But the persons examined may insist on having their declaration cancelled before they give testimony at the trial. Ersk. Princ. B. 4, t. 4, n. 49.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
For ease of reference I shall call one the "clairvoyance" condition and the other the "precognition" condition.
That is, although t his condition is referred to as the "clairvoyance" condition, it does not rule out the use of true precognition.
It was thought that any positive results from this condition would have to be by precognition. The participant would not be able to use real-time psi and/or calculation because of the difficulties in influencing and/or predicting stock market figures noted above.
Thus, even in the unlikely event that the experimenter could influence the whole range of postal systems to ensure that the materials arrived on a beneficial date, it is doubtful how profitable such a strategy would be if recourse to precognition is not possible.
Consequently, it was thought that for this condition of the experiment any positive results would yield strong evidence in favor of the possibility of true precognition.
Unknown to the participants, each set of pictures belonged to a different condition--one was a set for the clairvoyance condition and the other set was for the precognition condition.
When the experimenter received the materials, the participant number was noted and the experimenter retrieved the target numbers from the computer (i.e., the target number for the clairvoyance trial and the stock and city numbers for the precognition trial) for that participant.
The preplanned analyses--which were regarded as the experiment's main interest--were: (a) to use direct hits as a measure for psi for the overall database (i.e., both conditions together); (b) to use sum of ranks to assess each condition (clairvoyance and precognition) separately; and (c) a paired t-test to compare the two conditions.
In total, participants completed 74 usable trials in the clairvoyance condition and 75 in the precognition one, giving an overall total of 149 trials (out of the 216 trial materials that had actually been sent out).