Premises


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premises

n. 1) in real estate, land and the improvements on it, a building, store, shop, apartment, or other designated structure. The exact premises may be important in determining if an outbuilding (shed, cabana, detached garage) is insured or whether a person accused of burglary has actually entered a structure. 2) in legal pleading, premises means "all that has hereinabove been stated," as in a prayer (request) at the end of a complaint asking for "any further order deemed proper in the premises" (an order based on what has been stated in the complaint.) (See: real estate, structure)

PREMISES. that which is put before. The word has several significations; sometimes it means the statements which have been before made; as, I act upon these premises; in this sense, this word may comprise a variety of subjects, having no connexion among themselves; 1 East, R. 456; it signifies a formal part of a deed; and it is made to designate an estate.

PREMISES, estates. Lands and tenements are usually, called premises, when particularly spoken of; as, the premises will be sold without reserve. 1 East, R. 453.

PREMISES, conveyancing. That part in the beginning of a deed, in which are set forth the names of the parties, with their titles and additions, and in which are recited such deeds, agreements, or matters of fact, as are necessary to explain the reasons upon which the contract then entered into is founded; and it is here also the consideration on which it is made, is set down, and the certainty of the thing granted. 2 Bl. Com. 298. The technical meaning of the premises in a deed, is every thing which precedes the habendum. 8 Mass. R. 174; 6 Conn. R. 289. Vide Deed.

PREMISES, equity pleading. That part of a bill usually denominated the stating part of the bill. It contains a narrative of the facts and circumstances of the plaintiff's case, and the wrongs of which he complains, and the names of the persons by whom done, and against whom he seeks redress. Coop. Eq. Pl..9; Bart. Suit in equity, 27; Mitf. Eq. Pl. by Jeremy, 43; Story, Eq. Pl. Sec. 27; 4 Bouv, Inst. n. 4158.

References in periodicals archive ?
To:-the Chief Clerk at Dungannon Courthouse, 46 Killyman Road, Dungannon, BT71 6DE; the Clerk of Petty Sessions, Dungannon Courthouse, 46 Killyman Road, Dungannon, BT71 6DE; the District Commander at Dungannon PSNI, 1 Quarry Lane, Dungannon, BT70 1HX being the District Command Unit in which the applicant resides and in which the premises are situated; and Mid Ulster District Council, Circular Road, Dungannon, BT71 6DT being the district council for the district in which the premises are situated
The sub-committee has powers to modify the conditions of a licence, exclude a licensable activity from the scope of a licence, remove a designated premises supervisor, suspend a licence for a period not exceeding three months, or to revoke a licence altogether.
However, the LDA turned down the application saying that the premises did not have required space for the purpose and ordered for restoring the residential status of the SAFMA premises, he added.
"The premises was searched, under a table in a black bag there was a loaded pistol and a silencer.
The police had held meetings with the premises licence holder to address problems at the premises.
A tornado damaged power lines off premises although the municipality itself did not suffer any direct damage.
A total of 800 new exchanges are expected to benefit from the advanced copper broadband, including 400 exchanges in rural areas that will serve more than 900,000 premises.
C) Any premises used by you in connection with a premises in 4a and 4b above;
If your premises are part of a building/ estate/park, you will pay a service charge (usually quarterly in advance), being a proportion of costs incurred by a landlord in providing general estate services.
If the tenant is in default and refuses to vacate the premises, the individual guarantors face a personal downside.
An investment premise is a theory upon which a belief that a stock's price will rise or fall is based upon.
In addition to a leasehold mortgage that a lender requires to secure a loan, most lenders will also require a lien under the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) encumbering the company's equipment, trade fixtures, and other removable personal property located on the leased premises. The lease must include language that provides that such personal property is and will remain the property of the tenant, and may be removed from the premises by the tenant or its lender.