Press Complaints Commission


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Press Complaints Commission (PCC)

a voluntary body established to provide self-regulation of the press, taking over in 1991 from the PRESS COUNCIL. It operates on the basis of a code of behaviour. It relies upon the goodwill of the press itself which allows it to operate quickly. It makes no charge to complainants and there is little formality. Adherence to its code is made a term of the employment contracts of UK editors. It does not work to provide compensation but will order prominent publication of corrections and thus promotes accuracy. Its other concerns include privacy, which until the first decade of the twenty-first century had only limited legal protection.
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The Press Complaints Commission (PCC) is the independent body which governs the newspaper industry.
Our journalists adhere to the Editors' Code of Practice, which sets the benchmark for professional standards and is enforced by the Press Complaints Commission.
Our journalists adhere to the Editors Code of Practice, which sets the benchmark for high professional standards and is enforced by the Press Complaints Commission.
Our journalists adhere to the Editors' Code of Practice, which sets the benchmark for high professional standards and is enforced by the Press Complaints Commission.
Our journalists adhere to the Editors Code of Practice, which se ts the benchmark for high professional standards and is enforced by the Press Complaints Commission.
TheSunday Mail adheres to the system of self-regulation overseen by the Press Complaints Commission.
Ex-North Tyneside mayor Chris Morgan reported the Daily Mail to the Press Complaints Commission after it printed an article following his trial last year for pornography charges.
AT the Sunday People, our journalists adhere to the Editors' Code of Practice, which is enforced by the Press Complaints Commission.