Prime Minister


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Prime Minister

in the constitutional law of the UK, the leading minister of the Crown. Technically, primus inter pares, or ‘first among equals’, the position grew very considerably in stature and power over the latter part of the 20th century, taking on an ever more presidential function and, in some hands, style. The tasks are to form a government and to preside over the cabinet. The Prime Minister holds the offices of First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. The power of appointment or concurrence in appointments is vast and increases the power of the office. The Prime Minister is chosen by the sovereign, a power that is rarely more than a formal selection of the leader of the opposition or the next most senior minister of the ruling party. The title Deputy Prime Minister has no official standing and does not fetter the ROYAL PREROGATIVE in selecting the new Prime Minister. See also TAOISEACH, FIRST MINISTER, FIRST SECRETARY.
References in classic literature ?
There is another point," the Prime Minister continued.
The Duke assented, and waited while the secretary locked up the papers which the Prime Minister had been examining, and prepared others to be carried into the House.
The Prime Minister wants to have a talk, he tells me, and, all things considered, I think we'd better be dressing for dinner.
The Prime Minister, Lord Merivale, who was a long, slim man with curly gray hair, was gravely complimentary to his host about his success as a fisherman and the skill and patience he displayed; the conversation flowed like the shallow stream through the stepping-stones.
Prime Minister of no small State, a man accustomed to command, going out to save life.
At Eton he became intimate with Horace Walpole, the son of the Prime Minister, who was destined to become an amateur leader in the Romantic Movement, and after some years at Cambridge the two traveled together on the Continent.
Never did fall of any prime minister at court occasion wider surges of sensation than the report of Tom's fate among his compeers on the place.
I'll ring up the Prime Minister on the phone tomorrow, and buy a title myself.
He loved the jargon of committee-rooms; he loved the way in which the door kept opening as the clock struck the hour, in obedience to a few strokes of his pen on a piece of paper; and when it had opened sufficiently often, he loved to issue from his inner chamber with documents in his hands, visibly important, with a preoccupied expression on his face that might have suited a Prime Minister advancing to meet his Cabinet.
He could not help hearing within him the distinct declaration that Bulstrode was prime minister, and that the Tyke affair was a question of office or no office; and he could not help an equally pronounced dislike to giving up the prospect of office.
The two prime ministers lived in terror of Bunster, who never discussed any moot subject, but struck out with his fists instead.
So here I had to hold up the social end, entertain on board, be entertained ashore by planters, traders, governors, captains of war vessels, kinky-headed cannibal kings, and prime ministers sometimes fortunate enough to be clad in cotton shifts.

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