View

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VIEW. A prospect.
     2. Every one is entitled to a view from his premises, but he thereby acquires no right over the property of his neighbors. The erection of buildings which obstruct a man's view, therefore, is not unlawful, and such buildings cannot be considered a nuisance. 9 Co. R. 58 b. Vide Ancient Lights; Nuisance,

VIEW, DEMAND OF, practice. In most real and mixed actions, in order to ascertain the identity of land claimed with that in the tenant's possession, the tenant is allowed, after the demandant has counted, to demand a view of the land in question; or if the subject of claim be rent, or the like, a view of the land out of which it issues; Vin. Abr. View; Com. Dig. View; Booth, 37; 2 Saund. 45 b; 1 Reeves' Hist 435, This, however, is confined to real or mixed actions; for in personal actions the view does not lie. In the action of dower unde nihil habet, it has been much questioned whether the view be demandable or not; 2 Saund. 44, n, 4; and there are other real and mixed actions in which it is not allowed. The view being granted, the course of proceeding is to issue a writ, commanding the sheriff to cause the defendant to have a view of the land, It being the interest of the demandant to expedite the proceedings, the duty of suing out the writ lies upon him, and not upon the tenant; and when, in obedience to its exigency, the sheriff causes view to be made, the demandant is to show to the tenant, in all ways possible, the thing in demand with its metes and bounds. On the return of the writ into court, the demandant must count de novo; that is, declare again Com. Dig. Pleader, 2 Y 3; Booth, 40; and the pleadings proceed to issue.
     2. This proceeding of demanding view, is, in the present rarity of real actions, unknown in practice.

References in classic literature ?
A single glance showed him the truth, or at least a part of it--the steel projection that communicated the movement of the pointer upon the dial to the heart of the mechanism beneath had been severed.
But the smooth, even surface of the rocks afforded hardly a resting-place for a foot, much less those continued projections which would have been necessary for a descent of nearly a hundred feet.
A fiber rope, one end of which was tied to the boat, was made fast about a projection of the cliff face.
The projection of the terrace had prevented my seeing it.
As I looked, the handling-machine, with a faint and musical clinking, extended, telescopic fashion, a tentacle that had been a moment before a mere blunt projection, until its end was hidden behind the mound of clay.
"Verily it is neither-but beware how thou lettest the rope slip too rapidly through thy fingers; for should the wicker-work chance to hang on the projection of Yonder crag, there will be a woful outpouring of the holy things of the sanctuary."
They swept through the air in rapid, fantastic curves, occasionally precipitating themselves headlong with the speed of a bullet, and then breaking their line of projection by an abrupt and daring angle.
But the tide was coming in; the water was rising; the gulfs and lakes were filling; the straits were widening: it was time to seek some safer footing; so I walked, skipped, and stumbled back to the smooth, wide sands, and resolved to proceed to a certain bold projection in the cliffs, and then return.
And now, before I take up my tale, I want to anticipate the doubting Thomases of psychology, who are prone to scoff, and who would otherwise surely say that the coherence of my dreams is due to overstudy and the subconscious projection of my knowledge of evolution into my dreams.
Her mountains, her plains, every projection was as clearly discernible to their eyes as if they were observing it from some spot upon the earth; but its light was developed through space with wonderful intensity.
They approached the door, which was of an arched form, and flanked on each side by a narrow tower or projection of the edifice, in both of which were lattice-windows, the wooden shutters to close over them at need.
The far-off land may have bays, forelands, angles in and out to any number and extent; yet at a distance you see none of these (unless indeed your sun shines bright upon them revealing the projections and retirements by means of light and shade), nothing but a grey unbroken line upon the water.