Proponent


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Proponent

One who offers or proposes.

A proponent is a person who comes forward with an a item or an idea. A proponent supports an issue or advocates a cause, such as a proponent of a will.

PROPONENT, eccl. law. One who propounds a telling as "the party proponent doth allege and propound." 6 Eng. Ecclesiastical R. 356, n.

References in periodicals archive ?
Proponents: Imperial Oil and ExxonMobil Canada Ltd.
In general, students must enroll in the course (Course Number 9E/920-SI/ASI1E (MC-CT) through the Army Training Resources and Requirements System, though in some cases direct coordination with the proponent office is required.
Labarinto 15% Dare To Dance 14% Cry Fury 14% Riggins 8% Nanton 8% Tazeez 5% Red Gulch 5% Vainglory 5% Dhaamer 3% Questioning 3% Proponent 3% Shavansky 2% Pires 2% Emerald Wilderness 2% Who'll win the Betfred Cesarewitch (Oct 8)?
The DDACM, as the ALT workforce proponent and single point of contact on all matters pertaining to DAWIA implementation, is responsible for developing and approving all Army policies and procedures established to implement DAWIA.
The victors appear ready to turn to state school boards, where proponents of ID have made the most headway.
Many indigenous students at boarding schools hoped to find new career opportunities and did not intend, as the schools' proponents hoped, to return to their communities as cultural emissaries of the Mexican nation.
It is through the use of these dynamic models that APPD assists TSG, the AMEDD personnel proponent, in maintaining the integrity of the force by considering the size, training, career field management, arid all other variables that may impact AMEDD personnel and structure.
In a cosmological sense, intelligent design proponents hold that the universe itself shows proof of God's handiwork, a claim naturalistic science can neither confirm nor refute.
Even voucher proponent Moe, co-author of Politics, Markets and America's Schools, concedes this.
(3) Under the prior version of the law, which first became effective July 31, 1975, an award of attorneys' fees and costs to the good faith proponent for an unsuccessful effort was limited to the last known will of the decedent.