Prostitutes' Cards

Prostitutes' Cards

the object of legislation specifically designed to prevent the placing of advertisements relating to prostitution in or in the immediate vicinity of a public telephone box with the intention that it should come to the attention of others (Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001). Prostitution is assumed to cover all types of sexual services offered for reward. An advertisement will be considered an advertisement relating to prostitution if it is for the services of a male or female prostitute or if it indicates that such services are available at particular premises. An advertisement is to be presumed to be an advertisement for prostitution where a reasonable person would consider it to be one. A public telephone is any telephone in a public place that is made available for the use by the public or a section of the public and includes any structure such as a box, shelter or hood which it is located in or attached to. A ‘public place’ is one to which the public have access or are permitted to have access, whether on payment or otherwise. However the definition of public place excludes places to which children under 16 are not permitted to have access or places which are wholly or mainly residential.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A GROWING number of MPs have backed a demand for call barring of phone numbers on prostitutes' cards left illegally in phone boxes.
Karen Buck MP with Councillor Kit Malthouse, left, deputy leader of Westminster City Council and Paul Hendron, BT pay phones director, outside parliament yesterday with some of the thousands of prostitutes' cards they have collected Picture: JOHN STILLWELL
MINISTERS have started targeting prostitutes' cards in phone boxes.
A MAN suspected of posting prostitutes' cards in telephone boxes was arrested yesterday within two hours of laws making it illegal coming into force.
He is believed to be the first person to be arrested under the new law which makes it an offence to post prostitutes' cards in telephone boxes or other public places.
PLANS to strip prostitutes' cards from phone boxes have been unveiled by Home Office minister Charles Clarke.
Plans to strip prostitutes' cards from phone boxes were unveiled by Home Office Minister Mr Charles Clarke yesterday.
Karen Buck said the prostitutes' cards were often pornographic.
The new statute will also, for the first time, make posting prostitutes' cards in telephone boxes a criminal offence.
Welcoming the new anti-nuisance measures, Home Office Minister Keith Bradley said: "Anti-social drinking on the streets and prostitutes' cards in phone boxes can damage the image of an area.
Personally, I long ago became inured to the sight of a kiosk wall covered with prostitutes' cards (I refer to them as "an anthology of English pro's"), and regard them as an unavoidable part of city life, but I do wish the ladies of the night would make their messages clearer.