development

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Related to Psychosocial development: Cognitive development

development

(Building), noun commercial building, construction, creation of housing project, development of industrial sites, erection, house-building program, housing, industrial area, industrial building, institution of commercial sites, residential building, urbanization

development

(Outgrowth), noun accomplishment, achievement, aftergrowth, aftermath, attainment, conclusion, consequence, consequent, derivation, effect, emanation, ending, ensual, event, eventuality, occurrence, offshoot, outcome, product, realization, result, resultant, sequel, side issue, upshot

development

(Progression), noun accretion, advance, advancement, amelioration, ampliation, amplification, anabasis, auctus, betterment, change, effectuation, elaboration, enhancement, evolution, evolvement, expansion, explicatio, furtherance, gain, germination, gradual evolution, growth, improvement, increase in size, lengthening, modernization, progress, progress to maturity, prooressive growth, progressus, promotion, refinement, reformation, regeneration, remodeling, renovation, reorganization, revision, stimulation, strengthening, supplementation, transfiguration, transformation, unfolding, unravelment, upgrowth, uptrend
Associated concepts: development costs
See also: accession, advancement, augmentation, boom, building, complication, conclusion, consequence, creation, denouement, discipline, effect, enlargement, event, growth, happening, headway, improvement, increase, manufacture, nascency, offshoot, outcome, outgrowth, preparation, progress, prosperity, reform, rehabilitation, result, transition
References in periodicals archive ?
Reviewing psychosocial development in light of writing instruction, we found (a) developing competence focuses on students' development of intellectual and interpersonal skill competencies related to writing (e.
PSDT emphasizes the relationships between the university experience or environment and the psychosocial development of students, such as institutional factors, teaching and curriculum, and the interactive milieu of the campus.
Scrutinizing the university journey as a crucial stage for undergraduates' psychosocial development, Chickering and Reisser (1993) propose a psychosocial development theory which consists of seven vectors or tasks central to identity formation among traditional university- students: developing competence, managing emotions, moving through autonomy toward interdependence, developing mature interpersonal relationships, establishing identity, developing purpose, and developing integrity.
We also investigated the possible association of some external factors on psychosocial development, including age, education, age at marriage, infertility duration and body image in both groups.
To address this gap, we explored a theoretically based heuristic for practice, drawing on forgiveness and Eriksonian theories to extend the work of Romig and Veenstra (1998), and examined the relationship between forgiveness practices, counseling, and psychosocial development.
Generally, children of such parents perform well in all domains (social competence, psychosocial development and instrumental competence), (1-7) having more friends, better school performance, more self-discipline and emotional self-control.
Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development to CSR", International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4(3): 250-263.
Organizations can support girls and women in sport by providing a mentoring relationship aimed at career and psychosocial development.
This systemic level of counselor intervention has received increasing attention within the profession as counselors have been called on to become agents of systemic change to challenge social, cultural, or economic (macrolevel) barriers to optimal psychosocial development (Dinsmore, Chapman, & McCollum, 2000; Lee, 2007; Lewis, Lewis, Daniels, & D'Andrea, 1998).
The second contemporary issue that has had a major effect on psychosocial development of students with gifts and talents is the national No Child Left Behind (NCLB) policy, a part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
The ego strength of Hope emerges from the first stage of psychosocial development (Trust vs.
Older siblings, relatives, friends, neighbors, and childcare workers also share responsibility for the physical growth and psychosocial development of a child.

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