illness

(redirected from Psychosomatic illness)
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illness

noun affliction, ailing, ailment, complaint, disability, disease, disorder, infirmity, malady, sickness
Associated concepts: mental illness, terminal illness, Unemployment Compensation, Workers' Compensation Law
See also: disability, disease, disorder, prostration
References in periodicals archive ?
This question led to a new, recently completed research study which attempted to devise a wider-ranging therapeutic strategy, enabling us to arrest and, where possible, prevent the disorder from becoming chronic, as so commonly occurs in psychosomatic illness.
One possible explanation is that women are more frequently diagnosed with psychosomatic illness because they are more inclined than men to recognize that they are unwell and to seek treatment.
Nothing enrages activists - or many sick vets - like suggesting that Gulf War vets are suffering psychosomatic illness. Responding to the Presidential Advisory Commission's conclusion, Denise Nichols told The New York Times, "I am appalled that after five years [the government] is still busy denying physical damage...this is not stress."
The book ends by looking at what Shorter identifies as a major contemporary version of psychosomatic illness - chronic fatigue syndrome.
As a result, Darwin grieved insufficiently for his mother, and paid for this suppression with years of psychosomatic illness.
Outbreak of psychosomatic illness at a rural elementary school.
Because there were few physical clues at the time, many physicians assumed that fibromyalgia was largely a psychosomatic illness and that people with the condition were affected by depression and anxiety.
The disease, often referred to as "The Great Imitator,' is commonly misdiagnosed as fibrositis, skin photosensitivity and even psychosomatic illness. In addition, there are drugs that either induce SLE or exacerbate current symptoms, including hydralazine, an antihypertensive drug, and procainamide, a drug used to control irregular heartbeats.
As Dr Bullock was demonstrating a VR platform for treating psychosomatic illness, a fellow researcher with a chronic pain problem who was trying it out saw improvement in his condition, which led to national news coverage.
The third theory implies an unsolved conflict between reasons (such as continuous stress) and eventually creates a reaction of surrender and searching an adequate behaviour which leads to the development of the psychosomatic illness. It develops as a disguised depression.
"When you get a knock on the head that causes your brain to swell dangerously, or you have some kind of neurological, spiritual or psychosomatic illness, drilling a hole in the head becomes a reasonable thing to do," said Kurin, a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at UCSB and a specialist in forensic anthropology.