public company

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Related to Public corporations: Publicly traded

public company

a registered company that can offer its shares to the public. Its memorandum of association must state that it is a public company, that its authorized capital is at least the authorized minimum (£50,000) and that its name ends with plc (or public limited company).
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
On Thursday President Weah issued a countered directive authorizing all autonomous agencies and public corporations of the government to expend a cumulative amount of not more than USD $3,000 for operational expenses.
(1) Public sector debt (D3) = general government debt (D2) + nonfinancial public corporation debt General government debt (D2) = national debt (D1) + nonprofit public institution debt National debt (D1) = central and local government debt
The improved financial performance of the public corporations along with higher economic growth resulted in the drop of their net borrowings as a share of GDP to 22.4 percent from 27.1 percent in 2013, the DOF said.
Wal-Mart has also challenged state liquor laws in court, arguing that the ban on public corporations breaches consumer protection law.
Of Puerto Rico et al., Judge Besosa ruled that the federal Bankruptcy Code preempted the Recovery Act, a commonwealth law that authorized certain Puerto Rican public corporations to restructure their debts.
Complaints by private firms regarding unequal treatment favoring public corporations are also in the report.
Ahead of receiving a government license, the six expressway operators concluded a contract with the Japan Expressway Holding and Debt Repayment Agency, an independent administrative body that was created when the four highway-related public corporations were privatized, to manage their debts amounting to 40 trillion yen and assets.
While the established Protestant and Catholic churches have "public corporation" status in Germany, enabling them to benefit from state religious tax collection in return for church provision of social services, Muslims' organizational structure has been deemed insufficiently hierarchical (and its groups too small or impermanent) to merit such status German officials maintain that they have no basis for choosing among the Muslim organizations in granting public corporation status, while Muslims argue that the failure to resolve this issue is indicative of German unwillingness to recognize Muslims' religious needs and place Islamic religious organizations at the same level as the Christian Churches.
Unfortunately, compliance to Sarbanes-Oxley may be an added cost to public corporations, with no major gain to their bottom line.
The government is finally making moves to limit the bestowing of executive positions at public corporations and independent administrative agencies on retired top bureaucrats.
Critics of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 have raised concerns far beyond the usual assessment of increased compliance costs or the increased challenge of attracting new board members for America's public corporations. Indeed, some critics suggest that an unintended effect of the law is an erosion of corporate vitality.